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Before C++11 I have used swap-to-back to avoid deep copy overheads, like:

vector<vector<Object> > Objects;

for(/* some range */)
{
    vector<Object> v;
    for(/* some other range */)
    {
        v.push_back(/* some object */);
    }
    Objects.push_back(vector<Object>());
    Objects.back().swap(v);
}

How can I use std::move to move v into Objects to avoid deep copy overhead instead of swap?
I know there are a lot of workarounds here like multi arrays or just inserting directly into Objects.back(), but I need an example of usage of std::move to understand it.

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2  
Why do you create v at all? Why not just add a blank vector into Objects and then Objects.back().push_back() into it? That removes even more overhead while being simpler. –  Ayjay Oct 12 '11 at 0:05
    
@Ayjay: read the rest of the question –  Dani Oct 12 '11 at 0:06
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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted
vector<vector<Object> > Objects;

for(/* some range */)
{
    vector<Object> v;
    for(/* some other range */)
    {
        v.push_back(/* some object */);
    }
    Objects.push_back(std::move(v));
}
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But that leaves v behind. I understood that std::move should be somewhat destructive. –  Dani Oct 11 '11 at 23:46
2  
@Dani: Don't assume. Try it. Actually, reading the source for vector::vector(vector&&) would be enough as well. The semantics are eerily close to your std::swap version - but more elegant and possibly more efficient in the general case –  sehe Oct 11 '11 at 23:50
    
Definitely more efficient if Object's default constructor is non-trivial. –  ildjarn Oct 11 '11 at 23:52
9  
@Dani: What are you wanting to do with v after the move shown in sehe's code above? All he does is destruct it. Since ~vector<Object>() has no preconditions, a destruction after move is perfectly fine. Is there something else you would like to do? If so you could put it into a known state with something as simple as v.clear() (vector<Object>::clear() also has no preconditions and so may be called after a move). –  Howard Hinnant Oct 12 '11 at 1:44
1  
@Dani: "But that leaves v behind. I understood that std::move should be somewhat destructive." - Any time you use std::move meaningfully, you leave the variable in question behind. Its entire purpose is to cast something that isn't a rvalue into a rvalue. And no, it isn't destructive in any way, being just a cast. (But the purpose of the cast is to allow some function to "destroy" the passed object.) –  UncleBens Oct 12 '11 at 6:59
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Objects.push_back( std::move( v ) );
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2  
+1 for having the correct answer and getting a lot less attention –  sehe Oct 12 '11 at 0:08
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