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I'm having an issue with the wrong method being called. In my program, I have 3 classes: symbol, nonTerminal, and terminal. nonTerminal and terminal are both subclasses of symbol.

In my program, I only ever create a terminal or nonTerminal. Here are some condensed versions of each class:

#ifndef SYMBOL_H
#define SYMBOL_H

#include <vector>

class terminal;

using namespace std;

class symbol {
   public:
        virtual vector<terminal> getFirstSet();
};

#endif

_

#ifndef NONTERMINAL_H
#define NONTERMINAL_H

#include "symbol.h"
#include "terminal.h"
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class terminal;

class nonTerminal: public symbol {
    public:
        vector<terminal> getFirstSet();
};

#endif

_

#ifndef TERMINAL_H
#define TERMINAL_H

#include "symbol.h"
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class terminal: public symbol {
    public:
        vector<terminal> getFirstSet();
};

#endif

I have this function:

bool addFirst(symbol s) {
    vector<terminal> first = s.getFirstSet();
    //....
}

However, anytime I call it with a terminal or nonTerminal, it always uses the symbol::getFirstSet method. How can I get it to call the correct nonTerminal::getFirstSet or terminal::getFirstSet method?

share|improve this question
1  
Yay for formal languages implementation homework :P – bdares Oct 12 '11 at 0:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your function addFirst is receiving your object by value. What this means is that:

  1. Every time you call addFirst() a new symbol object is created and copied from existing terminal or nonTerminal.

  2. Whenever said copy occurs, the resulting object is neither terminal nor nonTerminal, but their base class - symbol.

To counter it, and to avoid copying the object, try passing your object by reference:

bool addFirst (symbol &_s) {
    vector<terminal> first = s.getFirstSet();
    //....
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This won't matter because the functions in the derived class are not virtual, and the virtual pointer is copied with the class anyway. – Dani Oct 12 '11 at 0:29
6  
@Dani : Methods marked virtual in the base class are implicitly virtual in any derived classes as long as the signature matches exactly otherwise (allowing for covariant return types). I.e., the functions in the derived classes are virtual in this case. – ildjarn Oct 12 '11 at 0:33
    
@ildjarn: but anyway, converting this to a reference won't help, as the virtual pointer is always copied – Dani Oct 12 '11 at 0:36
2  
@Dani : That's nonsensical. "Virtual pointers" are part of a type's vtable, and are never copied. Passing by reference is sufficient, as the C++ standard states that valid uses of polymorphic types is on pointers or object references. – ildjarn Oct 12 '11 at 0:40
2  
@Dani: No it isn't. You are wrong on both counts. When an object is constructed it has the type that is was constructed with. If an object is copied from an object of derived type, the derived parts will be sliced off by the copy. Imagine if it worked the way that you are suggesting. Either it would be impossible to statically determine size of an object, or it would be possible to call a derived function with a this that pointed to a base object (that might not have the additional members in the derived class). – Mankarse Oct 12 '11 at 0:41

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