Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a structure to hold a value based on a key that has a range. My implementation is C++, so any STL or Boost would be excellent.

I have as range-key, which are doubles, and value

  • [0,2) -> value1
  • [2,5) -> value2
  • [5,10) -> value3
  • etc

Such that a search of 1.23 should return value1, and so on.

Right now I am using a vector containing all three parts, key1/key2/value, with custom searching, but it feels like there should be a cleaner structure.

Edit: Thanks all. Given the ranges in this case are supposed to be contiguous and non-overlapping, the use of upper_bound will work just fine. Thanks for the class Range solutions as well, they are filed away for future reference.

share|improve this question
    
are ranges intersect? –  Mykola Golubyev Apr 21 '09 at 16:40
    
No, they should not –  sdg Apr 21 '09 at 17:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your ranges are contiguous and non-overlapping, you should use std::map and the upper_bound member function. Or, you could use a sorted vector with the upper_bound algorithm. Either way, you only need to record the lowest value of the range, with the upper part of the range being defined by the next higher value.

Edit: I phrased that confusingly, so I decided to provide an example. In coding the example, I realized you need upper_bound instead of lower_bound. I always get those two confused.

typedef std::map<double, double> MyMap;
MyMap lookup;
lookup.insert(std::make_pair(0.0, dummy_value));
lookup.insert(std::make_pair(2.0, value1));
lookup.insert(std::make_pair(5.0, value2));
lookup.insert(std::make_pair(10.0, value3));
MyMap::iterator p = lookup.upper_bound(1.23);
if (p == lookup.begin() || p == lookup.end())
    ...; // out of bounds
assert(p->second == value1);
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that be, "with the upper part of the range being defined by the next lower value."? –  Nick Presta Apr 21 '09 at 17:23
class Range
{
public:
    Range( double a, double b ):
        a_(a), b_(b){}
    bool operator < ( const Range& rhs ) const
    {
        return a_ < rhs.a_ && b_ < rhs.b_;
    }
private:
    double a_;
    double b_;
};
int main()
{
    typedef std::map<Range, double> Ranges;
    Ranges r;

    r[ Range(0, 2) ] = 1;
    r[ Range(2, 5) ] = 2;
    r[ Range(5, 10) ] = 3;

    Ranges::const_iterator it1 = r.find( Range( 2, 2 ) );
    std::cout << it1->second;

    Ranges::const_iterator it2 = r.find( Range( 2, 3 ) );
    std::cout << it2->second;

    Ranges::const_iterator it3 = r.find( Range( 6, 6 ) );
    std::cout << it3->second;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

How about something along these lines:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>
#include <sstream>


class Range
{
public:
    Range(double lower, double upper) : lower_(lower), upper_(upper) {};
    Range(const Range& rhs) : lower_(rhs.lower_), upper_(rhs.upper_) {};
    explicit Range(const double & point) : lower_(point), upper_(point) {};
    Range& operator=(const Range& rhs) 
    { 
    	lower_ = rhs.lower_; 
    	upper_ = rhs.upper_; 
    	return * this; 
    }

    bool operator < (const Range& rhs) const
    {
    	return upper_ <= rhs.lower_;
    }

    double lower_, upper_;
};

typedef std::string Thing;
typedef std::map<Range, Thing> Things;


std::string dump(const std::pair<Range,Thing> & p)
{
    stringstream ss;
    ss << "[" << p.first.lower_ << ", " << p.first.upper_ << ") = '" << p.second << "'" << endl;
    return ss.str();
}

int main()
{
    Things things;
    things.insert( std::make_pair(Range(0.0, 5.0), "First") );
    things.insert( std::make_pair(Range(5.0, 10.0), "Second") );
    things.insert( std::make_pair(Range(10.0, 15.0), "Third") );

    transform( things.begin(), things.end(), ostream_iterator<string> (cout,""), dump );

    cout << "--------------------------------------" << endl;

    things[Range(1.5)] = "Revised First";

    transform( things.begin(), things.end(), ostream_iterator<string> (cout,""), dump );


    return 0;
}

... program output:

[0, 5) = 'First'
[5, 10) = 'Second'
[10, 15) = 'Third'
--------------------------------------
[0, 5) = 'Revised First'
[5, 10) = 'Second'
[10, 15) = 'Third'
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't this what I've posted? –  Mykola Golubyev Apr 21 '09 at 17:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.