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I am trying to overload the '>' operator taking a pointer in parameter, however I get an error saying "operator > must have at least one parameter of type class". I do not get that error if I do not use pointer.

Note: S1 is a typedef'd structure, as well as elem.

bool operator>(S1 const *V1, S1 const *V2){
    if (V1->elem->code > V2->elem->code)
        return true;
    return false;
}

I use the operator in a case like this, for example :

S1 * funct(S1 *var1, S1 *var2){
    if (var1 > var2)
        return var1;
    return var2;
}
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Why not make it use references and dereference the pointers for comparison? ie. if((*var1) > (*var2)) –  GWW Oct 12 '11 at 1:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The compiler will want to turn your example into comparing the two pointer values. Having one parameter as a class type will tell it what it needs to know to resolve the overload.

bool operator>(const S1& V1, const S1& V2){
    if (V1.elem->code > V2.elem->code)
        return true;
    return false;
}

S1 * funct(S1 *var1, S1 *var2){
    if (*var1 > *var2)
        return var1;
    return var2;
}

Also, and I'm a bit rusty on this, but I think you have to declare the operator as a friend of S1, or make it a memeber.

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It does not need to be a friend or a member any more than any other function would. It only needs to be a friend if it attempts to access private or protected members of S1. –  Mankarse Oct 12 '11 at 1:56
    
Ahh, OK, thanks, @Mankarse. It's been a while since I did one of these that wasn't a member. –  kylben Oct 12 '11 at 1:58
    
I'm not sure about Mankarse's answer, but this solution seems to be working for me. Thanks –  MrRoy Oct 12 '11 at 2:13

This does not work because operator< is already defined for pointers. It is impossible to overload operators on built-in types because all of the operators that make sense for built-in types are already defined.

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In my opinion, when you want to define a new operator which has more than one parameter.there are two things you must do.

  1. Overload operator must be defined outside of the class.
  2. The overload operator must be declared a friend functions or class of the class.

That's my experience.

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