Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Paramiko to tail -f a file on a remote server.

Previously, we were running this via ssh -t, but that proved flaky, and the -t caused issues with our remote scheduling system.

My question is how to kill tail when the script catches a SIGINT?

My script (based on Long-running ssh commands in python paramiko module (and how to end them))

#!/usr/bin/env python2
import paramiko
import select

client = paramiko.SSHClient()
client.load_system_host_keys()
client.connect('someserver', username='victorhooi', password='blahblah')
transport = client.get_transport()
channel = transport.open_session()

channel.exec_command("tail -f /home/victorhooi/macbeth.txt")
while True:
    try:
        rl, wl, xl = select.select([channel],[],[],0.0)
        if len(rl) > 0:
            # Must be stdout
            print channel.recv(1024)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print("Caught control-C")
        client.close()
        channel.close()
        exit(0)

The script catches my Ctrl-C successfully, and ends. However, it leaves the tail -f process running on the remote system,.

Neither client.close() nor channel.close() seem to terminate it.

What command can I issue in the except block to kill it?

The remote server is running Solaris 10.

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

While not the most efficient method, this should work. After you CTRL+C; In the KeyboardInterrupt handler you could exec_command("killall -u %s tail" % uname) like so:

#!/usr/bin/env python2

import paramiko
import select

import time
ltime = time.time()

# Or use random:
# import random
# ltime = random.randint(0, 500)

uname = "victorhooi"
client = paramiko.SSHClient()
client.load_system_host_keys()
client.connect('someserver', username=uname, password='blahblah')
transport = client.get_transport()
channel = transport.open_session()

channel.exec_command("tail -%df /home/victorhooi/macbeth.txt" % ltime)
while True:
    try:
        rl, wl, xl = select.select([channel],[],[],0.0)
        if len(rl) > 0:
            # Must be stdout
            print channel.recv(1024)
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        print("Caught control-C")
        channel.close()
        try:
            # open new socket and kill the proc..
            client.get_transport().open_session().exec_command("kill -9 `ps -fu %s | grep 'tail -%df /home/victorhooi/macbeth.txt' | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'`" % (uname, ltime))
        except:
            pass
    
        client.close()
        exit(0)

This would kill any open processes named tail. That may cause issues though if you have tails open that you dont want to close, if thats the case you could grep a ps, get the pid and kill -9 it.

First, set tail to read n lines from end of file before following. set n to a unique nuber like time.time(), since tail doesn't care if that number is larger then the number of lines in the file, the large number from time.time()shouldnt cause issues and will be unique. Then grep for that unique number in the ps:

   client.get_transport().open_session().exec_command("kill -9 `ps -fu %s | grep 'tail -%df /home/victorhooi/macbeth.txt' | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'`" % (uname, ltime))
share|improve this answer
    
That might not work for us - we have many other tail processes running on the remote server for other things. Is there perhaps a way we can get the PID of the tail when running exec_command, save it, then kill it that way? (Yes, all these remote tails are somewhat messy - I'm hoping to replace it with a proper bus like RabbitMQ, but util then we have to make do). –  victorhooi Oct 12 '11 at 3:07
    
See my edits above, the formatting is all weird in this comment ). –  chown Oct 12 '11 at 3:11
    
Yup, that solution works. As you note however, it is a bit hacky (the whole grepping for PIDs, particularly if multiple people tail the same file). Still it works. I'm surprised there isn't a way to pull the PID via Paramiko, as you normally can with Python's POpen. Strange. –  victorhooi Oct 12 '11 at 23:37
    
That solution is not a pythonic solution.. You should never have to spawn a process on the remote machine to kill the command you already spawned... What if that command needs to be killed also? What if you are running an ssh server on a machine that doesn't have the kill command? –  Rusty Weber Aug 13 '13 at 1:01
add comment

There is one way to do this. It works like on the shell

ssh -t commandname

The option -t is opening a pseudo pty to help ssh to track how long this process should last. the same can be done via pormiko via

channel.get_pty()

prior to execute_command(...). This will not open a shell like it does with channel.invoke_shell(), it just requests such a pseudo interface to tie all processes to. The effect can also be seen if ps aux is issued on the remote machine, the process is now attached to the sshd with a ptxXY interface.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You should use ssh keepalives... the problem you have is that the remote shell has no way of knowing (by default) that your ssh session was killed. Keepalives will enable the remote shell to detect that you killed the session

client = paramiko.SSHClient()
client.load_system_host_keys()
client.connect('someserver', username='victorhooi', password='blahblah')
transport = client.get_transport()
transport.set_keepalive(1)   # <------------------------------
# ... carry on as usual...

Set the keepalive value as low as you like (even 1 second)... after several seconds, the remote shell will see that the ssh login died, and it will terminate any processes that were spawned by it.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I tried adding the set_keepalive(5) line - still no luck =(. The "tail -f" process still remains after Ctrl-C-ing the Python script, even after waiting for 5 seconds (or longer). Urgh. The remote server is Solaris 10, btw, if that matters at all. –  victorhooi Oct 12 '11 at 3:00
    
You'll need to wait for several keepalive intervals... set your keepalive to 1, and I'm pretty sure you'll see it terminate within 10 seconds (if Solaris behaves like my BSD boxes) –  Mike Pennington Oct 12 '11 at 3:01
    
@victorhooi you should edit the question with any relevant details like that. –  brc Oct 12 '11 at 3:02
    
@victorhooi, you it may make things easier for you if you explicitly invoke a shell with channel.invoke_shell()... although this will require more modifications to your script –  Mike Pennington Oct 12 '11 at 3:19
add comment

I just hit this issue and wasn't in a position to issue a pkill to close the process at the end.

A better solution is to change the command you are running to:

tail -f /path/to/file & { read ; kill %1; }

This will let you run your tail command for as long as you need. As soon as you send a newline to the remote process the kill %1 will execute and stop the tail command you backgrounded. (for reference: %1 is a jobspec and used to describe the first process that has been backgrounded in your session, ie the tail command)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here's a way to obtain the remote process ID:

def execute(channel, command):
    command = 'echo $$; exec ' + command
    stdin, stdout, stderr = channel.exec_command(command)
    pid = int(stdout.readline())
    return pid, stdin, stdout, stderr
share|improve this answer
add comment

Specifically for 'tail' you could use the --pid=PID argument and let tail take care of it:

  --pid=PID  with -f, terminate after process ID, PID dies
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.