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Here's what I have:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

    while(*argv++ != 0)
    {
            printf("Argument!\n");
            printf("%s %d\n",*argv,(int)strlen(*argv));
            int i = 0;

            while(*argv[i])
            {
                    printf("char!\n");
                    printf("%c\n",*argv[i]);
                    i++;
            }

            printf("End of for loop\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

When I run ./a.out test, the output is:

Argument!
test 4
char!
t
Segmentation Fault

I've been staring at this for a few hours. Why won't my program print each command line argument character by character?

I'm new to C, and the array-pointer duality, so I wouldn't be surprised if that were the problem. Any help is appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
This doesn't address yoour problem, but if you want to have programs with complex command lines, take a look at getoptlong() –  Mawg Oct 12 '11 at 3:22
    
What's your IDE? Did you step through the code in the debugger? What's the value of i just before the crash? –  Mawg Oct 12 '11 at 3:23
1  
No IDE. Command line in Unix. –  Mason Oct 12 '11 at 3:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First version

What you want is use argc:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < argc; i ++)
    {
    j = 0;      
    while(argv[i][j] != '\0')
       printf("Argument %d letter %d : %c\n", i,j,argv[i][j++]);   
    }
    return 0;
}

The output is actually letter by letter as you needed:

$./a.out hello world
Argument 0 letter 1 : .
Argument 0 letter 2 : /
Argument 0 letter 3 : a
Argument 0 letter 4 : .
Argument 0 letter 5 : o
Argument 0 letter 6 : u
Argument 0 letter 7 : t
Argument 1 letter 1 : h
Argument 1 letter 2 : e
Argument 1 letter 3 : l
Argument 1 letter 4 : l
Argument 1 letter 5 : o
Argument 2 letter 1 : w
Argument 2 letter 2 : o
Argument 2 letter 3 : r
Argument 2 letter 4 : l
Argument 2 letter 5 : d

Second version:

You can use the pointer notation for j but not for i since you don't know the letter count of each argument. It could of course be achieved by using strlen which would lead under the hood to an iteration through the string to count the letter, which is not what you want to do. If you can do it in one iteration through the argument why do it in two?

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int i = 0;int j = 0;
    while(i < argc)
    {
    j=0;
    while(*(argv[i]+j) != '\0')
    {
            printf("Argument %d letter %d : %c\n", i,j,*(argv[i]+(j)));
            j++;
    } 
     i++;
    }
    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect! I was wondering if you could also show the equivalent using pointers instead of arrays? I know theoretically they're the same, but it's the implementation of the pointers that are giving me trouble. –  Mason Oct 12 '11 at 3:35
    
I have done it, you can check. –  lc2817 Oct 12 '11 at 4:02

Try this:

while(argv) {
    printf("%s\n", *argv); /* %s instead of %c and drop [i]. */
    argv++; /* Next arg. */
}

When you say *argv[i], if argv[i] is NULL it will fail for obvious reasons.

Thou shalt not follow the NULL pointer, for chaos and madness await thee at its end.

share|improve this answer
    
If you use for (int i = 0; i < argc; i++) { printf("%s\n", argv[i]); } you don't get Segmentation fault :-). –  pevik Mar 21 at 16:48

You have two problems. One, you're incrementing argv to point to the next string at the beginning of each iteration of the outer while loop. When this gets to the last argument, argv will be NULL entering the last iteration, which will segfault when you dereference it.

Secondly, in the inner loop, you have the order of operations mixed. *argv[i] indexes into argv and then dereferences it, which takes the first character of the ith string, starting from the current index. When i exceeds the number of remaining arguments, this will also segfault.

Rewrite your outer loop as while(*(++argv)) (the parentheses around ++argv are optional but helpful) so that argv gets incremented before the null check; if you also want to print out the program name (in argv[0]), then move the increment to the end of the loop instead of in the loop condition.

Rewrite your inner loop as while((*argv)[i]), and rewrite the inner printf statement to also use (*argv)[i], so that the current argument gets dereferenced and then indexed into in that order.

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you will find the answer by studying http://faq.cprogramming.com/cgi-bin/smartfaq.cgi?answer=1046139290&id=1043284392

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  1. Modifying argv directly does not sound like a great idea. Make a copy and use it as you will.

  2. You cannot assume argv will at some point point to 0.

  3. Things like *argv[i] are extremely difficult to read: is that (*argv)[i], or *(argv[i])...

Be very careful when using pointers, otherwise you will keep on getting segfault.

The following code seems to work:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char **currentArgv = argv;
    int currentArgc = 0;
    while(++currentArgc < argc)
    {
            printf("Argument!\n");
            printf("%s %d\n",currentArgv[currentArgc],(int)strlen(currentArgv[currentArgc]));
            int i = 0;

            while(currentArgv[currentArgc][i]!='\0')
            {
                    printf("char!\n");
                    printf("%c\n",currentArgv[currentArgc][i]);
                        i++;
            }

            printf("End of for loop\n");
    }

    return 0;
}
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