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I have a microcontroller that returns a status response like this from an HTTP API:

<response><BS>026219AAF80F440206025019AAF816A944274480</BS></response>

The last two characters, in this case 80, represent a hexadecimal value that I need to convert to a its binary bits 10000000. Each bit is a flag that corresponds to a state on that piece of hardware.

For me to inspect each of the 8 bits, I need to take the string 80 (the whole response is a string and I just grab the last 2 characters) and turn it into a string representation of the binary 10000000 so I can inspect each of the 8 characters individually.

What's the best way to go about this? I'd like to do it in Python or Ruby, but I'm happy to learn the general technique of what I'm looking to do and then figure it out.

Note: I (obviously) don't have a CS background so much of this is foreign to me. I might be using the wrong nomenclature. Please feel free to correct me; I hope I got out the gist of what I'm looking for.

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"For me to inspect each of the 8 bits, I need to take the string 80 (the whole response is a string and I just grab the last 2 characters) and turn it into a string representation of the binary 10000000 so I can inspect each of the 8 characters individually." - no, you really don't! –  Nick Johnson Oct 12 '11 at 4:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In Ruby:

yourbits = "026219AAF80F440206025019AAF816A944274480"[-2,2].to_i(16).to_s(2)
=> "10000000"
puts yourbits
10000000
=> nil

Explaining each step -- first, slice the string to get the last 2 characters:

"026219AAF80F440206025019AAF816A944274480"[-2,2]
=> '80'

Convert it to Integer:

"80".to_i(16)
=> 128

Back to string againg, in a binary representation:

128.to_s(2)
=> '10000000'

There's probably a better (or less confusing) way of doing it, but I can't imagine it right now.

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1  
Shouldn't that .to_i be .to_i(16)? Hexidecimal 80 is 128 in decimal. –  Chron Oct 12 '11 at 4:17
    
There's nothing wrong with the proposed solution except you failed to convert '80' to base 16, but instead let to_i assume it was base 10. Use '80'.to_i(16) instead. The only caveat I see is possible loss of string values during to_s(2), which you can fix using String.format or %, for instance: '%08b' % '80'.to_i(16) => "10000000" –  the Tin Man Oct 12 '11 at 4:19
    
@chron -- yeah, you're right, it should. Not only that, but without .to_i(16) it would also break if, instead of "80", we had a "0F". Will fix. Thanks for pointing that out. –  lsdr Oct 12 '11 at 4:25
1  
to_i(16) can be written as hex. –  steenslag Oct 12 '11 at 10:34

If you're just testing individual bits then you can use it as a number instead.

>>> bool(int('80', 16) & 0x40)
False
>>> bool(int('80', 16) & 0x80)
True
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This is very helpful as background, but I should have mentioned that I only care about 4 of the 8 bits that are returned. I don't have all of the two-character status responses that the hardware can return so I'm not able to test them directly. –  Scott Oct 12 '11 at 14:24
    
Okay, so only test those 4 then. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 12 '11 at 22:14

Another option for decoding hex in Python is to use the decode method:

data = "026219AAF80F440206025019AAF816A944274480".decode("hex")

the last two characters form the last byte, which can be accessed with data[-1]. You can test individual bits using the & operator as Ignacio demonstrates.

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In python you can do this:

>>yourbits = str(bin(int("026219AAF80F440206025019AAF816A944274480"[-2:],16))[2:]) 
>>print yourbits 
1000000
>>print yourbits[0]
'1'

[-2:] is used to select "80" and [2:] is for removing the "1b" in front of the binary representation of the string.

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Thank you for this, I correct it. –  lc2817 Oct 12 '11 at 4:26
    
I really put myself in a corner by asking for both Python and Ruby samples. This was equally has helpful as the Ruby sample above. Thank you! –  Scott Oct 12 '11 at 14:26

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