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I have a view called Pannel which is just a background with a close button. I want to extend that view to one called PannelAdvanced. How would I do that with backbone.js?

Right now all the examples have Backbone.View.Extend but those just extend Backbone.View; I want to extend my PannelView.

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What have you tried? –  Jordan Oct 12 '11 at 4:13
    
It works exactly the same way - Panel.extend({ ... }) –  nrabinowitz Oct 12 '11 at 4:14
    
I have my Panel = Backbone.View.extend() then I have advancedPanel = Panel.extend() but when I do a console log for a variable in the initialize method of Panel inside of advancedPanel it shows up as undefined. –  Chapsterj Oct 12 '11 at 4:43
    
Can I just call Panel.extend() without instantiating Panel first. –  Chapsterj Oct 12 '11 at 4:59
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3 Answers

up vote 83 down vote accepted

The easiest way to inherit a view is to do what other people have already suggested in the comments:

var Pannel = Backbone.View.extend({
});

var PannelAdvanced = Pannel.extend({
});

But like you've noted in your comments, if you have an initialize method in Pannel, then it won't be called if you also have an initialize method in PannelAdvanced, so you have to call Pannel's initialize method explicitly:

var Pannel = Backbone.View.extend({
   initialize: function(options){
      console.log('Pannel initialized');
      this.foo = 'bar';
   }
});

var PannelAdvanced = Pannel.extend({
   initialize: function(options){
      Pannel.prototype.initialize.apply(this, [options])
      console.log('PannelAdvanced initialized');
      console.log(this.foo); // Log: bar
   }
});

It's a bit ugly because if you have a lot of Views that inherit from Pannel, then you'll have to remember to call Pannel's initialize from all of them. Even worse, if Pannel doesn't have an initialize method now but you choose to add it in the future, then you'll need to go to all of the inherited classes in the future and make sure they call Pannel's initialize. So here's an alternative way to define Pannel so that your inherited views don't need to call Pannel's initialize method:

var Pannel = function (options) {

    // put all of Panel's initialization code here
    console.log('Pannel initialized');
    this.foo = 'bar';

    Backbone.View.apply(this, [options]);
};

_.extend(Pannel.prototype, Backbone.View.prototype, {

    // put all of Panel's methods here. For example:
    sayHi: function () {
        console.log('hello from Pannel');
    }
});

Pannel.extend = Backbone.View.extend;


// other classes inherit from Panel like this:
var PannelAdvanced = Pannel.extend({

    initialize: function (options) {
        console.log('PannelAdvanced initialized');
        console.log(this.foo);
    }
});

var pannelAdvanced = new PannelAdvanced(); //Log: Pannel initialized, PannelAdvanced initialized, bar
pannelAdvanced.sayHi(); // Log: hello from Pannel
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1  
This pattern doesn't work with events being declared in both child and parent as the parent's events key in the dict is overwritten by the child's when you call var PannelAdvanced = Pannel.extend({events:{...}}). You can declare a parentsEvents key in the parent, and call then this.delgateEvents(this.parentEvents) in the parent constructor but then due to this line in backbone, they will again be dropped due to the child view. –  AJP Mar 1 '13 at 15:06
2  
Actually you can do it. Declare the child events in a childEvents key or whatever, then in the parent, declare an events function with: return _.extend({"click .parentClass": "parentFunction"}, this.childEvents) –  AJP Mar 1 '13 at 15:20
    
Using _super is not the best choice. github.com/jashkenas/backbone/pull/787#issuecomment-14327908 –  Thiago Festa Jan 7 at 17:31
    
I agree. It's better to use prototype. I updated my answer to reflect this. –  Johnny Oshika Jan 8 at 18:25
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To piggyback further a bit:

I liked @JohnnyO's approach but wanted to confirm that a resulting view was still capable of doing everything it's supposed to. Given his approach, I didn't suspect there would be any issues, but I wanted to be a bit more certain.

So, I took a minute and adapted the Backbone.js Views test suite to the multiple inheritance technique @JohnnyO proposes.

You can run the results at http://jsfiddle.net/dimadima/nPWuG/. All tests pass.

My base and extended views:

var RegularView = function (options) {
  // All of this code is common to both a `RegularView` and `SuperView`
  // being constructed.
  this.color = options && (options.color || 'Green');

  // If execution arrives here from the construction of
  // a `SuperView`, `Backbone.View` will call `initialize`
  // that belongs to `SuperView`. This happens because here
  // `this` is `SuperView`, and `Backbone.View`, applied with
  // the current `this` calls `this.initialize.apply(this, arguments)`
  Backbone.View.apply(this, arguments)
};

RegularView.extend = Backbone.View.extend;

_.extend(RegularView.prototype, Backbone.View.prototype, {
  // Called if a `RegularView` is constructed`,
  // Not called if a `SuperView` is constructed.
  initialize: function () {
    console.log('RegularView initialized.');
  },

  say_hi: function() {
    console.log('Regular hi!');
  }

});

var SuperView = RegularView.extend({
  // Called if a `SuperView` is constructed`,
  // Not called if a `RegularView` is constructed.
  initialize: function(options) {
    console.log('SuperView initialized.')
  },

  say_hi: function() {
    console.log('Super hi!');
  }
})

For the test suite, I grabbed the latest views tests from GitHub and replaced occurrences of Backbone.View with RegularView. The tests then use RegularView and the results of RegularView.extend() to make sure both do what they're supposed to.

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This is one of the reasons I like using Coffeescript so much. Things like inheritance are so much nicer. To piggyback @JohnnyO's correct answer, I can say the same thing in Coffeescript:

class Panel extends Backbone.View
    initialize: ->
        console.log 'Panel initialized'
        @foo = 'bar'

class PanelAdvanced extends Panel
    initialize: ->
        super
        console.log 'PanelAdvanced initialized'
        console.log @foo
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1  
Nice. Maybe it's time to learn CoffeeScript :-) –  Johnny Oshika Oct 13 '11 at 3:27
    
Yeah, except this doesn't actually seem to work –  Samuel Feb 2 '12 at 10:21
3  
Looks like it works for me: jsfiddle.net/AGKyw –  frank hadder Feb 25 '12 at 21:29
5  
I translated that to javascript just to see if I get it write: jsfiddle.net/7qssz super becomes Panel.prototype.initialize.apply(this, arguments); –  NicoGranelli Aug 7 '12 at 1:29
    
"I got it right"* –  NicoGranelli Aug 7 '12 at 1:36
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