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I would like to maximize use of the screen for a Honeycomb app. Since the bottom of the screen is already stuck with "always-on" items, I'd like to add a menu button down there in that space rather than sacrificing more screen space putting an "action bar" across the top. How can I accomplish this without downgrading to API 10 or less? (As much as I don't need an action bar using up more space, I also don't need a resize button that does my app no good at all and can't be disabled except by going to a very recent API version.)

Surely one can make some kind of effective use of hundreds of pixels that currently sit dark and wasted at the bottom of a Honeycomb screen, between the back/home/thingy icons and that ever-present clock? It'll be a ridiculous waste of yet more space to create an action bar for the purpose of having a single settings button tucked in the corner.

Edit: I see others have asked somewhat similar questions but in general, how can we make use of the otherwise wasted space at the bottom by adding buttons or what have you down there? If I have to create my own menu button from scratch I will, but I get the impression that this space is unusable (which would be pretty absurd if true).

Edit 2: Apparently it's true: The "system bar" is indeed inviolable and mostly exists to present unoccupied space to the user (particularly in landscape mode). Looks like I may have to revert back to an older SDK - as long as nobody uses the zoom icon it should be fine.

Edit 3: I'm pleased to report that with API 10 the menu button is back AND the useless zoom button is GONE (using android:xlargeScreens="true" in the supports-screens appears to work in this API!)

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See my very similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/7688854/… (and lack of useful answers). –  Pointer Null Oct 12 '11 at 8:25
    
See that upvote you got on your comment there? I did that a little while ago when I found that exact question/answer as I was researching this. The whole thing is kinda ridiculous but whatever, as my app tends to use its own on-screen controls anyway I can readily add my own "menu" icon to them when the time comes. An "action bar" at the top of the screen is IMHO ergonomically weird and virtually useless for my app (which is made to be easy to use). Reaching across the screen to hit menu buttons defeats that purpose. –  MartyMacGyver Oct 12 '11 at 8:38
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How can I accomplish this without downgrading to API 10 or less?

You can't.

Surely one can make some kind of effective use of hundreds of pixels that currently sit dark and wasted at the bottom of a Honeycomb screen, between the back/home/thingy icons and that ever-present clock?

Only if you are modifying the operating system. You can put a Notification down there, in the lower right, but that is designed for alerts, not menus.

It'll be a ridiculous waste of yet more space to create an action bar for the purpose of having a single settings button tucked in the corner.

Then use a button to bring up your settings. Or some gesture, or whatever.

how can we make use of the otherwise wasted space at the bottom by adding buttons or what have you down there?

You don't. That is for the OS to use. Just because there is whitespace does not mean that space is "wasted" -- having an overly-complicated control area is not necessarily a good thing, as those with UX and design experience will point out.

The whole thing is kinda ridiculous

If you mean your attitude, yes, it is "kinda ridiculous".

Android developers have a well-deserved reputation for not adhering to any sort of conventions or standards, resulting in applications that don't look and work like one another. Partly, this is Android philosophy -- Google doesn't enforce human interface guidelines the way Apple does. However, Google does provide frameworks to steer developers in a direction that promotes consistency between apps. Some of these frameworks have existed for quite some time (e.g., PreferenceScreen); others are new (action bar).

You do not have to use the action bar. Lots of applications won't, such as games. If you are not using the action bar, though, it is up to you to provide the entire user experience, and to do so in a way that users will find intuitive even though you are eschewing platform frameworks.

Using an old target API level will increasingly confuse users who are used to applications that are up to date. Right now, there are certainly plenty of applications that are not targeting API Level 11 or higher and therefore have the system bar MENU button. That will change over the next year. Eventually, a preponderance of users will have no idea how to access your menu, because they will not notice this funny-looking icon that appears in the system bar or not know what it does. Some of these users will wonder why you don't have a menu in the upper-right corner like most of their other applications.

If you don't want an action bar, you can roll your own upper-right-corner menu, using an ImageButton and PopupMenu, for example. That, at least, will keep you consistent with other apps that do use an action bar, putting the menu where users will expect to see it. Or do something else more integrated with the rest of your UI as a menu affordance. Don't rely on the legacy-support MENU button in the system bar for long -- while it should be supported indefinitely, users will be adapting faster than perhaps you are.

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Let's not make this personal - I'm criticizing the UI decisions here, not the individuals. As for the presence or lack of a menu button, there's a specific place in the UI for it, reserved specifically for legacy apps, on the bottom left. I don't see that disappearing anytime soon, if ever. What's ridiculous is that if you use a newer API that option is removed entirely. As for UI design, moving the menu button to the upper-right corner, an awkward reach on a touch-screen, especially when the legacy menu is in the diametrically opposite corner of the screen is very unintuitive. –  MartyMacGyver Oct 12 '11 at 14:21
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As for standards and fragmentation, taking the menu button from its normal place among the other control buttons such as "home" and shifting it to the opposite upper corner of the screen certainly isn't in keeping with a consistent user experience. If there's a concern about confusing users then this is indeed a good way to accomplish that. Using a phone? The menu is in the usual place. Using a tablet? Suddenly the menu is elsewhere. As for user confusion, anyone who has an Android phone will know where the menu normally is - on the bottom, with all the other nav buttons. –  MartyMacGyver Oct 12 '11 at 14:34
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(I can't really do your long reply justice in the space for one comment.) My point is, there's already confusion because of this and it'll remain for some time. I don't see popular games (with custom menu screens) getting always-on action bars to take up screen space - and given that's a very popular app type it will only lead to more fragmentation as each comes up with a gesture or other way to make a menu or the action bar appear without having the action bar on-screen all the time. A menu button in a known place with the other basic buttons, even in "full-screen" mode, is reasonable. –  MartyMacGyver Oct 12 '11 at 14:41
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Note: At this point there's no changing Honeycomb itself - the boundaries are clearer now. There is no way short of using an older API to get the menu button to appear with the other nav buttons, even if having an action bar onscreen at all times detracts from certain apps. We can all agree that fragmentation is not a good thing, but in my opinion removing the menu button from the gutter where it appears for legacy apps removes a consistent way for all developers to snap open the action bar when it's hidden, leading to continued UI fragmentation for such apps. That decision was shortsighted. –  MartyMacGyver Oct 12 '11 at 15:11
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When Android "cops an attitude" by deprecating basic functionality in favor of a shortsighted UI choice then a similar response to that design decision is not unreasonable - and is very different from attacking an individual or copping an attitude to someone personally. As for opinions, I'm not alone in finding the removal of the hard menu button to be a counter-productive design choice. It could easily reveal the action bar and open its menu, helping users migrating from handhelds and ensuring ready access to a hidden action bar. Instead, the menu button is present but only for old apps. –  MartyMacGyver Oct 12 '11 at 16:13
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