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As a library developer, I want to prevent my library users (Windows, MSVC) from linking to the wrong configuration (not to link the debug library to their release programs, and vice versa).

Is it possible to warn the user during compile time that (s)he should link to the right configuration of the library ?

EDIT

Both debug and release versions should be available to allow Windows developers to debug their applications. So both debug and release versions of my library should be available.

I am asking this question because lot of the support to Windows beginner developers is caused by them mixing debug and release code, and getting difficult-to-debug runtime errors.

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Why do you want your clients to debug your library? Are you supplying source code with it? Design your API so that compiler settings don't matter. The COM ABI is a good example. –  Hans Passant Oct 12 '11 at 9:40
    
If you create a static lib instead of a dll you have to add the debug version any way. Else noone is able to create a debug version at all. –  Totonga Oct 12 '11 at 14:33

4 Answers 4

Good question, I've always assumed that developers using my libraries would link to the correct version. Now that I think about it, why would you even want to release your debug library to the public? Why shouldn't both their debug and release versions link against your release library?

Regardless, I see a way of doing this by exporting some symbols per configuration:

//header:
class DLLIMPEXP Dummy
{
   static int x;
   virtual void dummy();
}
//cpp
#ifdef DEBUG
int Dummy::x = 0;
void Dummy::dummy()
{
}
#endif

As you can see, your symbol will only be exported if your module is compiled in DEBUG. Trying to link against the lib in release mode from a third module would result in a linker error. You can have something similar for the reverse case.

I don't suggest you do this though, I would rather document it or only distribute the release version of my module.

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Quite interesting. You got me an idea: add the non inlined function IsReleaseVersion() which will be in the library. And add in the constructor inlined check (which will be included in the application side) to check its version. –  Phong Oct 12 '11 at 9:16
    
I just edited the question to answer some of yours. This will trigger a link error only when the user tries to use that symbol in his own code. Moreover, I want the users to get a clear message telling them "you are not linking to the right library". –  Mourad Oct 12 '11 at 9:27
    
@Mourad: you can name the missing symbol as PleaseUseReleaseVersionOfXxxLibrary, likewise PleaseUseDebugVersionOfXxxLibrary. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 12 '11 at 9:41
    
@Mourad what about static members? Would that work? You can't get a clear message, but you could rename the member to something like "heyManQuitUsingTheDebugLibraryForTheReleaseVersion"... –  Luchian Grigore Oct 12 '11 at 9:42

There are two different aspects here:

  • incompatibility issue
  • performance issue

If it is a matter of performance, then the choice should still be theirs, they might wish to debug.

If it is a matter of incompatibility, one simple thing is to change the namespace for the debug version, so that symbols are mangled differently.

#ifdef NDEBUG
  namespace project {
#else
  namespace project { namespace debug {
#endif

// content

#ifdef NDEBUG
  }
#else
  }
  using namespace debug;
  }
#endif

By nesting in a debug namespace, you change the mangling of the symbols (even though, compilation-wise, it does not change anything). This actually prevent linking a library compiled against the debug version with the release version (and thus solves the incompatibility early on rather than crashing mysteriously).

However, I would urge you to reserve this to a very specific set of classes (it's heavy).

It should be possible, normally, to be able to provide compatible interfaces in both the Debug and Release modes, so that clients can hot-swap at load time.

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You can add a #warning directive but i strongly discourage you to do it. You should better deliver to different version of your library with two different name.

Here is another hint for your problem:

myLib.h  // Release Version
myLibd.h // Debug Version

Doing it like that, it will force the user to take care when they will set up the application with your library (since the setting must be manual).

You can also add a note in the README or INSTALL, most of the user read it when they want to set up the linking on MSVC.

You can also check for the DEBUG and NDEBUG macro value in your program. (With an assert during your library initialization.

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Add this code to the header of your lib

Different names for different types

#ifndef _DLL
// C runtime as dll
#  ifdef _DEBUG
#    pragma comment(lib, "MyLibD.lib")
#  else
#    pragma comment(lib, "MyLib.lib")
#  endif
#else
// C runtime statically
#  ifdef _DEBUG
#    pragma comment(lib, "MyLibSD.lib")
#  else
#    pragma comment(lib, "MyLibS.lib")
#  endif
#endif

Different path for different types

#ifndef _DLL
// C runtime as dll
#  ifdef _DEBUG
#    pragma comment(lib, "debug/dynamic/MyLib.lib")
#  else
#    pragma comment(lib, "release/dynamic/MyLib.lib")
#  endif
#else
// C runtime statically
#  ifdef _DEBUG
#    pragma comment(lib, "debug/static/MyLib.lib")
#  else
#    pragma comment(lib, "debug/static/MyLib.lib")
#  endif
#endif

afterwards you only have to add the path to the lib to your linker and you are no longer able to mix it up.

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1  
This is not generally considered good practice (specifying libraries in the code), but it's a solution so I won't downvote. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 12 '11 at 11:19
    
If you develop a static lib and not a dll I would always prefere this. There are so many advantages and avoided errors that I would not care for philosophical reasons. –  Totonga Oct 12 '11 at 14:32

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