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I have two tables, TableA and TableB.

TableA is a large dataset with thousands/millions of record and has a unique key (ID) and 3 alternate keys (NAME,SCHOOL,DATE). Table B is a smaller dataset with thousands of record and has no unique keys.

TableA
---------
ID
NAME
SCHOOL
DATE
RECORD
STATUS
TableB
---------
NAME
SCHOOL

Now, I need to join these two tables to get the list of unique IDs to be use in another query. Below is the sample query, but this took so long more hours to run.

SELECT a.ID AS ID_key, a.school, a.name
   FROM TableA a, TableB b
 WHERE a.name = b.name
  AND a.school = b.school
  AND a.status = 'Active' 

Is there any way to optimize this query? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
@All, thank you for the answer ^_^ – Ianthe Oct 13 '11 at 0:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why are you joining the tables at all if all the information required is in table A?

The only possible reason I can think of is if you want to exclude rows in A that don't have a corresponding row in B but, if your schema is set up properly, you would probably have a foreign key constraint to enforce that.

If that's not the case, get rid of the join altogether:

SELECT a.ID AS ID_key,
       a.school,
       a.name
FROM   TableA
WHERE  status = 'Active' 

If there is a valid reason for the join (and, from your comment, that seems to be the case), make sure that you have indexes on name and school in both tables, and that your runstats (or whatever Oracle calls its query optimisation data) are up to date.

Also run a query analysis (explain) on that query to find out where the problem lies. Once you have that as a baseline, you can begin modifying things (like adding indexes) to see if the query improves. Remember the #1 mantra for optimisation: measure, don't guess!

share|improve this answer
    
TableB is an input table or the info need to search from TableA – Ianthe Oct 12 '11 at 9:30
    
@paxdiablo: Don't you mean a compound index on (name, school) for the join? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Oct 12 '11 at 9:40
    
@ypercube, possibly. It would depend on other queries as well. If, as seems likely, table B is used only for white-list selection, the composite index would be better. You'd still have to measure to be certain. – paxdiablo Oct 13 '11 at 0:59

is there any indexes defined?

you can try this:

 SELECT a.ID AS ID_key, a.school, a.name
   FROM TableA a
 WHERE (a.name, a.school ) in (select b.name, b.school from tableB b)
  AND a.status = 'Active' 
share|improve this answer

If it is not a problem for you(privileges etc), add an index on TableB.name and TableB.school columns.

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