Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class with a public array of bytes. Lets say its

Public myBuff as byte()

Events within the class get chunks of data in byte array. How do i tell the event code to stick the get chunk on the end? Lets say

Private Sub GetChunk
  Dim chunk as byte
  '... get stuff in chunk
  Me.myBuff += chunk '(stick chunk on end of public array)
End sub

Or am I totally missing the point?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

if i remember right, in vb you want to redim with preserve to grow an array.

share|improve this answer
    
but can you do that with an array defined as a public item in the class ? i.e. can you use the erserved words piblic and redim together ? –  WaveyDavey Sep 16 '08 at 21:37
    
You can, but the performance sucks, class or no class. –  Joel Coehoorn Sep 16 '08 at 21:38
    
ReDim Preserve yourArray(newSize) –  David J. Sokol Sep 16 '08 at 21:38

If the array is small, and new data is infrequently added, an easy way would be to:

public BufferSize as long 'or you can just use Ubound(mybuff), I prefer a tracker var tho
public MyBuff

private sub GetChunk()
dim chunk as byte
'get stuff
BufferSize=BufferSize+1

redim preserve MyBuff(buffersize)
mybuff(buffersize) = chunk
end sub

if chunk is an array of bytes, it would look more like:

buffersize=buffersize+ubound(chunk) 'or if it's a fixed-size chunk, just use that number
redim preserve mybuff(buffersize)
for k%=0 to ubound(chunk) 'copy new information to buffersize
  mybuff(k%+buffersize-ubound(chunk))=chunk(k%)
next

if you will be doing this frequently (say, many times per second) you'd want to do something like how the StringBuilder class works:

public BufSize&,BufAlloc& 'initialize bufalloc to 1 or a number >= bufsize
public MyBuff() as byte

sub getdata()
bufsize=bufsize+ubound(chunk)
if bufsize>bufalloc then
  bufalloc=bufalloc*2
  redim preserve mybuff(bufalloc)
end if
for k%=0 to ubound(chunk) 'copy new information to buffersize
  mybuff(k%+bufsize-ubound(chunk))=chunk(k%)
next
end sub

that basically doubles the memory allocated to mybuf each time the pointer passes the end of the buffer. this means much less shuffling around of memory.

share|improve this answer

You'll be constantly using the ReDim keyword, which is extremely inefficient.

Are you using .Net? If so, consider using a System.Collections.Generic.List(Of Byte) instead. You can use it's .AddRange() method to append your bytes, and it's .ToArray() method to get an array back out if you really need one.

share|improve this answer
    
List(Of Byte) seems to have some size limitations. It can't go above a certain threshold, while the ArrayList can. –  David J. Sokol Sep 16 '08 at 21:42
    
List(Of Byte)'s Count and Capacity properties are Int32s, same as ArrayList. ArrayList will box every byte you put in it, adding masses of GC and memory overhead. Perhaps you ran into a virtual memory fragmentation problem? Rare to get a 2GB free block of VM. –  Mike Dimmick Sep 17 '08 at 0:30
    
I don't believe so. I was doing it all on a x64 box. The arraylist shot up to around 3.5gb before I killed it, while the List died around 900mb. –  David J. Sokol Sep 17 '08 at 16:02

Your question doesn't seem to be very clear. You should probably not have the array of bytes as public. It should probably be private and you should provide a set of public functions that allow users of the class to perform operations against the array.

share|improve this answer

I think you might be looking for something other then an array. If you are trying to gradually extend the amount of data frequently, you should use a dynamic data structure such asArrayList. This has an Add method which adds the specific object or value to the array without concerns for space. It also has a nifty ToArray() method that you can use.

If you are trying to use an array for specific reasons (performance, I guess), use ReDim Preserve array(newSize).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.