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Consider this table:

TABLE names
+-------+-------+-----+-------------+
| id    | f_key |name | sort_metric |
+-------+-------+-----+-------------+
|     1 |     1 |   a |           1 |
|     2 |     1 |   b |           2 |
|     3 |     1 |   c |           0 |
|     4 |     2 |   d |           0 |
|     5 |     2 |   e |           2 |
|     6 |     2 |   f |           1 |
|     7 |     3 |   g |           1 |
|     8 |     3 |   h |           0 |
...
|  9999 |  2500 | zzz |           2 |
| 10000 |  2500 | zzz |           0 |
+-------+-------+-----+-------------+

There are nearly 10,000 rows in this table. I have a query, which returns the correct results, but appears to be begging for optimization.

The query returns the f_key and name from this table ordered by (sort_metric, id) for each f_key. This query is run quite often so I'd like to make it as efficient as possible.

SELECT
  name_a.f_key, name_a.name 
FROM ( 
    SELECT 
      DISCTINCT f_key 
    FROM 
      names
    WHERE 
      f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 )
  ) f_keys 
  JOIN names names_a ON names_a.id = ( 
    SELECT 
      names_b.id 
    FROM 
      names names_b
    WHERE 
      names_b.f_key = f_keys.f_key 
    ORDER BY 
      sort_metric ASC, id ASC LIMIT 1
  )

The count of items in the IN ( ... ) clause is 24 every time, but the items are not sequential, and change often. id is the primary key and I have additional indexes on (f_key) and (sort_metric, id).

In particular, the derived table SELECT DISTINCT f_key FROM names WHERE f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 ) seems silly to me. Is there not a way to use a static provided list as a derived table more efficiently? I can't figure out how to do that. Anyone?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The count of items in the IN ( ... ) clause is 24 every time

Then using an 'IN clause is the way to go - but the query you've provided does a LOT of unnecessary work (does joining a query with a 'WHERE' predicate referencing across te jion actually work?????) unless I'm much mistaken, this should produce the same result:

SELECT names.f_key, names.name
FROM names
WHERE names.f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 );

update

OK - I see the second query is retricted to select the first item from names for each f_key - in which case....

SELECT n1.f_key, n1.name
FROM names n1
WHERE n1.f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 )
AND NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT 1 FROM names n2
    WHERE n2.f_key=n1.f_key
    AND ((n2.sort_metric>n1.sort_metric)
      OR (n2.sort_metric=n1.sort_metric
         AND n2.id>n1.id))
)

...or use the max concat trick to eliminate the subselect...

SELECT n.f_key, SUBSTRING(
    MIN(CONCAT(LPAD(sort_metric, 8, '0'),LPAD(id, 8, '0'), name)),
    17) AS name
FROM names n
WHERE n.f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 )
GROUP BY f_key
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Thank you for this. I was able to a) understand it and b) adapt it to my project and it appears to work. (I see you made some edits, the same ones I had to make to make it work =) –  mkoistinen Oct 12 '11 at 12:13

If I understand your query correctly, you intend to select the record with the lowest sort_metric, and if there are more of these the one with the lowest id. Your double selfjoin is caused by not wanting to duplicate the ugly in() list. Another way to accomplish this is by means of a CTE, needing only one self-join:

WITH ext AS (
  SELECT id,f_key,name,sort_metric
  FROM tmp.names
  WHERE  f_key IN ( 1, 3, 254, 257, 301, 273, 279 )
  )
SELECT t1.*
  FROM ext t1
  WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT *
    FROM ext t2
    WHERE t2.sort_metric <= t1.sort_metric
    AND t2.f_key = t1.f_key
    AND t2.id < t1.id
    )
  ORDER BY t1.id
  LIMIT 1
  ;
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Thank you wildplasser. Sadly, I was selecting an answer while you were still submitting this. This looks pretty good too, but I am curious if this would work in MySQL? –  mkoistinen Oct 12 '11 at 12:18
    
I also expect someone to come up with a WINDOW solution. –  wildplasser Oct 12 '11 at 12:22
    
I don't know much about mysql. IIRC it does have CTEs but it does not have recursive queries. I posted it only because it is a relatively clean solution ande the post was tagged SQL. YMMV. –  wildplasser Oct 12 '11 at 12:24
    
Just looked it up: mysql does not seem to have the CTE-thingy. A workaround would be to create a temporary VIEW and use that. Remember: a CTE is only a lambda kind of view... –  wildplasser Oct 12 '11 at 12:33

This is overly complicated! Try:

SELECT DISTINCT names_a.f_key, names_a.name
  FROM names names_a
  LEFT JOIN names names_b ON names_b.f_key = names_a.f_key
                         AND (names_b.sort_metric < names_a.sort_metric
                              OR (    names_b.sort_metric = names_a.sort_metrict
                                  AND names_b.id < names_a.id
                                 )
                             )
 WHERE names_a.f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 )
   AND names_b.id IS NULL;
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1  
Benoit, your solution appears to largely work and is, in fact, very similar to @symcbean's. However, it didn't accomodate my need to provide the list of f_keys, and only returns the whole list. This seems minor, but in the end, symcbean's is more complete. I am upvoting your solution though! –  mkoistinen Oct 12 '11 at 12:15
    
@mkoistinen: Actually I had forgotten to report your condition on names_a.f_key. Here it is. –  Benoit Oct 12 '11 at 13:05

I'm not sure I understood your question well (if not, please formulate more precisely what output you want), but from your sentence *"The query returns the f_key and name from this table ordered by (sort_metric, id) for each f_key"* it seems that the solution is simple like this:

select f_key, name

from names

where f_key IN ( 254, 257, ..., 273, 279 )

order by sort_metric, id
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This would return only a single row. I need one row EACH per f_key. –  mkoistinen Oct 12 '11 at 12:02
    
@mkoistinen, nope, that would return many rows, and multiple rows for each f_key. –  TMS Oct 12 '11 at 12:18
    
Multiple rows, Really? Have you tried it? Besides, I need ONE row per f_key. Specifically the one with the smallest sort_metric or smallest id when there are multiple rows with the smallest sort_metric. –  mkoistinen Oct 12 '11 at 12:22
    
@mkoistinen, depends on table content, but the f_key IN (...) condition can be fulfilled many times. "I need ONE row per f_key" - you haven't said that. You should formulate the question more precisely, as I said. –  TMS Oct 12 '11 at 12:43

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