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I'm developing small REST service which should support client session persistence. As you know because of REST we can't store any client data on the server, data must be stored on client side and client's request must be self-sufficient. So...how we can store client sessions? Searching over the internet I've found some methods how to realize this. For example: we send to the client encrypted token which contains client's id(nick...etc), like token = AES(id, secretKey); and then we're authorize user every request decrypting token on the server with secret key. Can anyone advise anything? Maybe there is another good ways to do same functionality. Which crypto algorithm will be preferable for this? Thanks.

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What are you trying to achieve with these persisted client sessions? Is it simply a performance optimization of the authentication process? –  Darrel Miller Oct 12 '11 at 12:47
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up vote 8 down vote accepted

You mentioned:

As you know because of REST we can't store any client data on the server, data must be stored on client side and client's request must be self-sufficient.

REST doesn't say you can't store client data on the server; it just says you shouldn't store application state there, which you can think of as "what this client is in the middle of trying to do".

If you are primarily trying to just have a concept of authenticated users, then a standard login cookie will work just fine and is not "unRESTful".

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the only logical explanation i found. Hope that it is correct –  Parhs Sep 14 '13 at 16:10
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It all comes down to your answer to this question: why do you need a "session" concept in the first place?

If you need to ensure that the client passes a cookie representing a set of credentials, consider instead having the client pass them as HTTPS authentication headers with each request instead.

If you need some sticky routing rules to be followed (to make sure that the client's request gets sent to a particular server), consider using this opportunity to get rid of that architectural straightjacket as it is the quickest way to kill your chances of future scalability. Instead, make your server choice arbitrary.

If you absolutely must route to a specific node, try requiring that the client pass enough identification data that you can use it to hash or shard the client down a particular "swim lane". You could split things up based on their username, for example.

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