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I was just wondering if there is a best practice concerning label and input tag :

classic way:

<label for="myinput">My Text</label>
<input type="text" id="myinput" />

or

<label for="myinput">My Text
   <input type="text" id="myinput" />
</label>
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29  
One of the big pros of putting the <input /> inside the <label>, is that you can omit for and id: <label>My text <input /></label> in your example. So much nicer! –  Znarkus Sep 11 '11 at 14:56
6  
While I agree that input does not semantically belong inside of a label, I noticed today that the developers of Bootstrap disagree with me. Some elements, such as inline checkboxes, are styled differently depending on whether the input is inside or out. –  Blazemonger Aug 21 '13 at 21:41

11 Answers 11

up vote 208 down vote accepted

From w3: The label itself may be positioned before, after or around the associated control.

<label for="lastname">Last Name</label>
<input type="text" id="lastname" />

or

<input type="text" id="lastname" />
<label for="lastname">Last Name</label>

or

<label>
   <input type="text" name="lastname" />
   Last Name
</label>

Note that the third technique cannot be used when a table is being used for layout, with the label in one cell and its associated form field in another cell.

Either one is valid. I like to use either the first or second example, as it gives you more style control.

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8  
As answered, all are valid but in my own practice I typically settle on the first example given here by superUntitled for textboxes, textareas, and selects. But for radio buttons and checkboxes, I usually use the third example, where I want the input before the accompanying text and don't want the same kind of fixed width and/or floating that the rest of the labels and fields are using. So on any single given form, you might find me using both of these formats together. –  Funka Jun 8 '11 at 0:36
6  
According the W3.org the third variant is a no-no for WCAG compliant sites, because "the names associated with the text input controls are not properly determined by assistive technology." (See w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F68.html ). I do wonder if that is actually true? –  Sorcy Oct 13 '11 at 9:24
4  
I wonder if <label for="inputbox"><input id="inputbox" type="text" /></label> is a pass according to their criteria. –  Matt Feb 1 '12 at 22:53
10  
@Sorcy Yes it is. Implicit labels - that is an input inside a label without proper for/id attributes - aren't understood by assistive technologies (AT) and that's a failure for accessibility and WCAG 2.0. It can seem very very dumb to see that, for years and still going, AT can't find a label for an input when the input is right into a label (I think it is) but, well, we have to do with this situation (it's not that hard to code, happily). Consider contributing to NVDA or ORCA screen reader projects if you can, your help will be well received! –  FelipeAls Mar 4 '12 at 13:49
7  
Too bad that you can not nest a label inside an input tag. Would be much more semantically rational, since the label really is a property of the input, if you see it from an abstract point of view. –  Alex Mar 14 '14 at 7:04

I prefer

<label>
  Firstname
  <input name="firstname" />
</label>

<label>
  Lastname
  <input name="lastname" />
</label>

over

<label for="firstname">Firstname</label>
<input name="firstname" id="firstname" />

<label for="lastname">Lastname</label>
<input name="lastname" id="lastname" />

Mainly because it makes the HTML more readable. And I actually think my first example is easier to style with CSS, as CSS works very well with nested elements.

But it's a matter of taste I suppose.


If you need more styling options, add a span tag.

<label>
  <span>Firstname</span>
  <input name="firstname" />
</label>

<label>
  <span>Lastname</span>
  <input name="lastname" />
</label>

Code still looks better in my opinion.

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2  
Including the input inside the label is the same as using HTML for layout. –  Emil Sep 13 '11 at 8:08
16  
@Emil: Because? –  Znarkus Sep 13 '11 at 8:28
1  
I like this solution also for cases like this: <label>Expires after <input name="exp" /> days</label> (label is before and after the input element) –  Philipp Jul 28 '14 at 11:37

There is also a behavior difference: if you click on the space between the label and the input it activates the input only if the label contains the input.

This makes sense since in this case the space is just another character of the label.

<p>Inside:</p>

<label>
  <input type="checkbox" />
  |&lt;----- Label. Click between me and the checkbox.
</label>

<p>Outside:</p>

<input type="checkbox" id="check" />
<label for="check">|&lt;----- Label. Click between me and the checkbox.</label>

Being able to click between label and box means that it is:

  • easier to click
  • less clear where things start and end

Current Bootstrap checkbox examples use the input inside: http://getbootstrap.com/css/#forms Might be wise to follow them.

UX question that discusses this point in detail: http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/23552/should-the-space-between-the-checkbox-and-label-be-clickable

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This isn't a spec difference. The toggle works for both cases in all compliant browsers. –  hexalys Dec 26 '14 at 20:32
    
@hexalys Thanks for the report. I've updated the answer. Do you mean compliant browsers should toggle or not on both cases? If you could link to the relevant standard passage that would be awesome. –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 Dec 26 '14 at 20:40
    
As long as an explicit for attribute is associated with an input type, it shall focus and/or toggle on modern browsers (see compat). There are few browser exceptions though such as iOS that need a hack. –  hexalys Dec 26 '14 at 21:04
    
@hexalys are we talking about the same thing: cliking between label and input checkbox? –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 Dec 26 '14 at 21:24
1  
Yes. Though I failed to notice that your example is misleading because your space isn't really a text space. It's a margin of the checkbox. The Firefox behavior on your example is peculiar and seems like a bug. A label will contain the spaces or padding around inline content as clickable. But given that a label's Content model is inline/Phrasing content the margin of input shouldn't be clickable, unless your label is made display: block in which case the inside of the label block become clickable in all browsers. –  hexalys Dec 26 '14 at 22:56

As most people have said, both ways work indeed, but I think only the first one should. Being semantically strict, the label does not "contain" the input. In my opinion, containment (parent/child) relationship in the markup structure should reflect containment in the visual output. i.e., an element surrounding another one in the markup should be drawn around that one in the browser. According to this, the label should be the input's sibling, not it's parent. So option number two is arbitrary and confusing. Everyone that has read the Zen of Python will probably agree (Flat is better than nested, Sparse is better than dense, There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it...).

Because of decisions like that from W3C and major browser vendors (allowing "whichever way you prefer to do it", instead of "do it the right way") is that the web is so messed up today and we developers have to deal with tangled and so diverse legacy code.

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Referring to the WHATWG (Writing a form's user interface) it is not wrong to put the input field inside the label. This saves you code because the for attribute from the label is no longer needed.

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See http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html#h-17.9 for the W3 recommendations.

They say it can be done either way. They describe the two methods as explicit (using "for" with the element's id) and implicit (embedding the element in the label):

Explicit:

The for attribute associates a label with another control explicitly: the value of the for attribute must be the same as the value of the id attribute of the associated control element.

Implicit:

To associate a label with another control implicitly, the control element must be within the contents of the LABEL element. In this case, the LABEL may only contain one control element.

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A notable 'gotcha' dictates that you should never include more than one input element inside of a <label> element with an explicit "for" attribute, e.g:

<label for="child-input-1">
  <input type="radio" id="child-input-1"/>
  <span> Associate the following text with the selected radio button: </span>
  <input type="text" id="child-input-2"/>
</label>

While this may be tempting for form features in which a custom text value is secondary to a radio button or checkbox, the click-focus functionality of the label element will immediately throw focus to the element whose id is explicitly defined in its 'for' attribute, making it nearly impossible for the user to click into the contained text field to enter a value.

Personally, I try to avoid label elements with input children. It seems semantically improper for a label element to encompass more than the label itself. If you're nesting inputs in labels in order to achieve a certain aesthetic, you should be using CSS instead.

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3  
This isn't a "gotcha". It's explicitly part of the spec; the label may contain up to 1 control in it. You're also mixing the implicit and explicit styles here -- if you put the control inside the label, you don't need for...and if you want to use for, then having the control inside the label doesn't make much sense. –  cHao Nov 27 '11 at 3:49
    
True, but it would seem that this specification isn't well-understood. We ran into this issue with Drupal 6's forms API, which generated markup that created a scenario not unlike that described above. It had my colleague and I scratching our heads for a minute or two, so I thought I'd air out the issue here to avert potential confusion in the future. –  Aaron Nov 30 '11 at 0:06
    
no need for "for" in label->input scenario. one input per label and it has the benefit of not having to know the name or id and you can do nice css styling to keep things encapsulated as well as having the focus occur when any other element such within is clicked. see zipstory.com/signup for example of clean way of doing this. –  Jason Sebring May 15 '12 at 1:48
    
Thank you; this answered another related question I had, namely whether it goes to have potentially more than one input inside a label. (Context: Several radio button options, one per line, each radio button entry having 1, 2, 3, or possibly more inputs of type text, with the intent of clicking on a line having the result of selecting that line's radio button, if not selected, and allowing editing of the input/inputs on that line.) This leaves the door open to having multiple labels for non-input text in the form, but it answered my question about whether what I thought of was OK. (It wasn't.) –  JonathanHayward Nov 21 '13 at 20:14

I usually go with the first two options. I've seen a scenario when the third option was used, when radio choices where embedded in labels and the css contained something like

label input { vertical-align: bottom; }

in order to ensure proper vertical alignment for the radios.

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Personally I like to keep the label outside, like in your second example. That's why the FOR attribute is there. The reason being I'll often apply styles to the label, like a width, to get the form to look nice (shorthand below):

<style>
label {
  width: 120px;
  margin-right: 10px;
}
</style>

<label for="myinput">My Text</label>
<input type="text" id="myinput" /><br />
<label for="myinput2">My Text2</label>
<input type="text" id="myinput2" />

Makes it so I can avoid tables and all that junk in my forms.

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+1: I agree with this! Best way. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 8 '11 at 8:56
1  
Shouldn't you leave presentation to CSS, instead of using <br /> to separate the inputs? –  Znarkus Sep 11 '11 at 14:47
    
@Znarkus - yes, normally I wrap them in OL/LIs to deal with formatting like that, this was just a quick shorthand example. –  Parrots Sep 11 '11 at 15:01
    
@Parrots: That doesn't make much sense semantically, imo. And if you need to wrap them, why not just wrap them with the label? –  Znarkus Sep 11 '11 at 15:06
    
@Znarkus it's an ordered list of fields you want the user to fill out, right? If you want the labels to appear to the left and be fixed-width (UX of positioning labels to the left or above the field aside), keeping the inputs outside the label avoids the need for fixed positioning. –  Parrots Sep 12 '11 at 22:49

As I recall, both are correct, but putting the input inside the label makes it much less flexible when styling with CSS.

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If you include the input tag in the label tag, you don't need to use the 'for' attribute.

That said, I don't like to include the input tag in my labels because I think they're separate, not containing, entities.

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3  
The for requires you to use an id though, which makes structuring the layout hierarchically very hard :-( –  lethalman Apr 18 '13 at 10:51

protected by Community Jun 7 '14 at 19:20

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