Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an input which when im clicking - i want to see alert with '1,2,3,4...' (each press)

<input type='button' value='press' onclick='Clicked();'  />

 <script>
  var t
    function Clicked()
      {
        t=func;
        t();
      }  


     function func()
      {
        var count=0;
         return new  function ()   // <===  new or not new ???
          {
          count++;
          alert(count);
          }
      }
 </script>      

If im adding the 'new' in the return and click , it says : '1,1,1,1,...'

If im removing the 'new' it doesnt work...

My goal is to use this to get : '1,2,3,4...'

Can someone explain to me what happens ?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to use the returned function:

var t = func()
function Clicked() {
    t();
}  

function func() {
    var count=0;
    return function () {
        count++;
        alert(count);
    }
}

Example

share|improve this answer
    
I choose this question since it does not have a closure on the root enviroment. but why did you write 'var t = func()' with the '()' ? you dont want to execute it you just want a reference to the inner func...? no? I thought it should be like this : 'var t = func;' and then later to write t()...where is my mistake ? –  Royi Namir Oct 12 '11 at 14:42
    
You're actually returning a function. The inner function isn't executed with func(), but a reference is created to the returned function. –  Joe Oct 12 '11 at 14:48

You have to put the count declaration out of the "func" function and into the global namespace. Like this:

var count=0;
function func() {
    count++;
    alert(count);
}
share|improve this answer
    
too quick for me styrr –  Justin Oct 12 '11 at 14:15

You're creating a new var count every time the clickevent fires.. You should place the var count = 0 outside the function as a global variable..

oh and btw, throw out the return stuff please this will work properly:

var count = 0;
function func()
{
    count++;
    alert(count);
}

And call this method like this: func();

share|improve this answer

You are getting 1,1,1,1 because you are redefining count every time you call func().

In your case you will need to either put the count variable in the global scope:

var t; var count = 0;

or change the way you are doing things a little:


var t = 0;
function Clicked(){
    t = func(t);
}  


function func(count){
    count++;
    alert(count)
    return count;
}

Personally I like the second one. You have less global variables, one less function declaration, and it is cleaner

share|improve this answer
var t
function Clicked()
{
    t=func;
    t();
    }  

var count=0;
function func()
{

    return new  function ()   // <===  new or not new ???
    {
        count++;
        alert(count);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.