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Today while i was coding , I encounter something which I didn't expect it to happen in this way.Below is just an example code for the problem.

The Code 1

while(true)
{
 int i = 1;

 printf("This is %d\n" , i);
 ++i;
 if(i == 10)
   break;
}

The Code 2

for(int i = 1 ; ; i++)
{
 printf("This is %d\n" , i);
 if(i == 10)
    break;
}

The Question :

1.)The first code would causes infinite loop while the latter is not.

2.)I don't understand , there's a standard mention variable declare inside while loop can be accessed by any statement inside the while loop , but why the if() can't access the value of variable i while the latter can??

Thanks for spending time reading my question

share|improve this question
    
sorry i forgot to indent the code just now –  caramel1995 Oct 12 '11 at 14:41
    
Nope it does , i've try using C language and PHP both yield the same result –  caramel1995 Oct 12 '11 at 14:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's very simple:

for(int i = 1 ; ; i++)
{
    printf("This is %d\n" , i);
    if (i == 10)
        break;
}

is equivalent to

{
    int i = 1;
    while (true)
    {
        printf("This is %d\n" , i);
        if (i == 10)
            break;
        i++;
    }
}

I.e., the int i = 1 part is executed before the first iteration of the for-loop. for introduces an implicit extra scope block holding any variables declared in the X of for (X;Y;Z).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks :) appreciate –  caramel1995 Oct 12 '11 at 14:48

C has the notion of block scopes. A variable declared in a given scope has a lifetime equivalent to that scope. In the while loop case that means there is one i variable for every iteration of the loop. Every time the loop restarts it creates a new i and sets it's value to 1. The i++ only evaluates once on that instance and hence it will never reach 10 and will indeed infinite loop.

The first code sample can be fixed by simply moving the i before the while loop.

int i = 1;
while (true) {
  printf("This is %d\n" , i);
  ++i;
  if(i == 10)
    break;
}

Now i is declared in the outer scope and hence there will be one i for all of the iterations of the while loop.

The for loop case works for nearly the same reason. The iteration variable declared in a for loop is defined once for all iterations of the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, C has block scope, but since C99 there's an implicit extra block introduced by for. –  larsmans Oct 12 '11 at 14:44
    
thanks for clarifying , i started to understand the logic behind this :), really thank you for all the precious answers given –  caramel1995 Oct 12 '11 at 14:48

The issue is that in your while loop, not only are you declaring i, you're initializing it. So on every loop iteration, i is reset to 1, causing your infinite loop.

The for loop initializes i = 1 first, before starting the loop, so it's more like writing a while loop like this:

int i = 1;
while (true)
{
    printf("This is %d\n" , i);
    if (i == 10) break;
    i++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clarifying :) –  caramel1995 Oct 12 '11 at 14:48

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