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How do you create a Perl module?

I have the script that reads an xml file and creates hash table. its working properly but now i need to create module for that code, that i can call in my main function.In my main function file path as input and it gives output as hash. now i need to create module for this code.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use XML::LibXML::Reader;

#Reading XML with a pull parser
my $file;
open( $file, 'formal.xml');
my $reader = XML::LibXML::Reader->new( IO => $file ) or die ("unable to open file");
my %nums;
while ($reader->nextElement( 'Data' ) ) {
    my $des = $reader->readOuterXml();
    $reader->nextElement( 'Number' ); 
    my $desnode = $reader->readInnerXml(); 
    $nums{$desnode}= $des;
    print( " NUMBER: $desnode\n" );
    print( " Datainfo: $des\n" );
}

how can i create module for this code?

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marked as duplicate by Quentin, Nikhil Jain, musiKk, CanSpice, DavidO Oct 12 '11 at 17:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Take a look at the Perl Documentation. One of the tutorials included is perlmod. This offers a lot of good information.

First step: Make your program into a subroutine. That way, you can call it your code. I've taken the liberty to do that:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use Carp;
use XML::LibXML::Reader;

#Reading XML with a pull parser
sub myFunction {
    my $fh = shift; #File Handle (should be opened before calling

    my $reader = XML::LibXML::Reader->new( IO => $fh )
        or croak ("unable to open file");
    my %nums;
    while ($reader->nextElement( 'Data' ) ) {

        my $des = $reader->readOuterXml();

        $reader->nextElement( 'Number' ); 
        my $desnode = $reader->readInnerXml(); 

        $nums{$desnode} = $des;
    }
    return %nums;
}

1;

I've made a wee change. You notice that I no longer open a file. Instead, you'll pass a file handle to your MyFunction subroutine. Second, instead of printing out $desnode and $des, it now returns a hash that has these values in them. You don't want subroutines to output data. You want them to return the data, and let your program decide what to do with the information.

I've also put in a use Carp; line. Carp gives you two functions (as well as a few others). One is called carp which is a replacement for warning, and the other is called croak which is a replacement for die. What these two functions do is report the line number in the user's program which called your function. That way, the user doesn't see the error in your module, but their program.

I've also added the line 1; at the bottom of your program. When a module loads, if it returns a zero on load, the load fails. Thus, your last statement should return a non-zero value. The 1; guarantees it.


Now that we have a subroutine that you can return, let's make your program into a module.

To create a module, all you have to do is say package <moduleName> on top of your program. And, also make sure that the last statement executes with a non-zero value. The tradition is just to put a 1; as the last line of the program. Modules names end with a .pm suffix by default. Modules names can have components in the names separated by double colons. For example File::Basename. In that case, the module, Basename.pm lives in the directory File somewhere in the @INC list of directories (which, by default includes the current directory).

The package command simply creates a separate namespace, so your package variables and functions don't collide with the names of the variables and functions inside the program that uses your package.

If you use an object oriented interface, there's no reason why you need to export anything. The program that uses your module will simply use the object oriented syntax. If your module is function based, you probably want to export your function names into the main program.

For example, let's take File::Basename. This module imports the function basename and dirname into your program. This allows you to do this:

my $directoryName = dirname $fileName;

Instead of having to do this:

my $direcotryName = File::Basename::dirname $fileName;

To export a function, make sure your module uses the Exporter module, and then set the package variable @EXPORT_OK or @EXPORT to contain the list of functions you're allowing to be exported in the user's program. The difference is that if you say @EXPORT_OK, the functions will be exported, but the user must request each one. If you use @EXPORT, all those functions will automatically be exported.

Using your program as a basis, your module will be called Mypackage.pm and look like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

package Mymodule;

use warnings;
use strict;
use Exporter qw(import);
use Carp;
use XML::LibXML::Reader;

our @EXPORT_OK(myFunction);

#Reading XML with a pull parser
sub MyFunction {
    my $fh = shift; #File Handle (should be opened before calling

    my $reader = XML::LibXML::Reader->new( IO => $fh )
        or die ("unable to open file");
    my %nums;
    while ($reader->nextElement( 'Data' ) ) {

        my $des = $reader->readOuterXml();

        $reader->nextElement( 'Number' ); 
        my $desnode = $reader->readInnerXml(); 

        $nums{$desnode}= $des;
    }
    return %nums;
}

1;

The big thing is the use of:

  • package Mypackage
  • use Exporter qw(import)
  • our @EXPORT_OK qw(myFunction);

The package function sets up an independent name space, so your variables and function names don't override (or get overwritten) by the user's program.

The use Exporter says that your program is using the import function of the Exporter module. This allows you to import variables and functions into the main namespace of the user's program. That way, the user can simply refer to your function as mi_function_name instead of Mypackage::my_function_name. In theory, you don't have to export anything, and newer modules don't. These module are entirely object oriented or just don't want to bother with namespace issues.

The @EXPORT_OK array says what you're exporting. This is preferred over @EXPORT. With @EXPORT_OK, the developer must specify what functions he wants to import into their program. With @EXPORT, this is done automatically.

In the program that uses your module, you'll need to do this:

use Mypackage qw(myFunction);

Now, all you have to do in your program is

my %returnedHash = myFunction($fh);

Now, things are constantly evolving in Perl, and I've never received any formal training. I simply read the documentation and take a look at various examples and hope that I understand them correctly. So, if someone might say that I'm doing something wrong, they're probably correct. I've also didn't test any of the code. I might have screwed something in your program when I turned it into a subroutine.

However, the gist should be correct: You need to make your code into callable subroutines that return the information you need. Then, you can turn it into a module. It's not all that difficult to do.

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thank you very much i solved my problem by reading your code and data you provided, it helps me alot.@david. –  viswa Oct 13 '11 at 8:57

You need to create a file with .pm extension, i.e. "MyModule.pm" with this code:

package MyModule;
use warnings;
use strict;
use XML::LibXML::Reader;

sub mi_function_name {
   #Reading XML with a pull parser
   my $file;
   open( $file, 'formal.xml');
   my $reader = XML::LibXML::Reader->new( IO => $file ) or die ("unable to open file");
   my %nums;
   while ($reader->nextElement( 'Data' ) ) {
      my $des = $reader->readOuterXml();
      $reader->nextElement( 'Number' ); 
      my $desnode = $reader->readInnerXml(); 
      $nums{$desnode}= $des;
      print( " NUMBER: $desnode\n" );
      print( " Datainfo: $des\n" );
   }
}

1; #this is important

And in the file you want to use this module:

use MyModule;
#...
MyModule::mi_function_name;

This is a very simple and basic usage of a module, I recommend the lecture of better tutorials (http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=102347) to gain further knowledge on this

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