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What is most convenient and shortest way to get start and end dates of the previous week? Example: today is 2011-10-12 (input data),but I want to get 2011-10-03 (Monday's date of previous week) and 2011-10-09 (Sunday's date of previous week).

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1  
You should use Joda (joda-time.sourceforge.net) for that, it's much easier for such use-cases than any of Java's built-in classes. –  martin Oct 12 '11 at 15:17
    
Also, Joda-time is proven. Cheers! –  Oh Chin Boon Oct 12 '11 at 15:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's another JodaTime solution. Since you seem to want Dates only (not timestamps), I'd use the DateMidnight class:

final DateTime input = new DateTime();
System.out.println(input);
final DateMidnight startOfLastWeek = 
    new DateMidnight(input.minusWeeks(1).withDayOfWeek(DateTimeConstants.MONDAY));
System.out.println(startOfLastWeek);
final DateMidnight endOfLastWeek = startOfLastWeek.plusDays(6);
System.out.println(endOfLastWeek);

Output:

2011-10-12T18:13:50.865+02:00
2011-10-03T00:00:00.000+02:00
2011-10-10T00:00:00.000+02:00
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And if your week is not Monday to Sunday? –  jarnbjo Oct 12 '11 at 16:20
1  
@jarnbjo what a strange reason to downvote. why not just ask? anyway, I changed the code to use the constant for monday. How to change it to sunday should be rather obvious now. BTW, out of curiosity: who's week doesn't start on monday? –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 12 '11 at 16:29
1  
This is the shortest solution. I've already implemented, thanks a lot! –  Viktors Oginskis Oct 12 '11 at 17:17
    
@Viktors: Short and incorrect. –  jarnbjo Oct 12 '11 at 18:42
1  
@martin well, that's a great song, after all –  Sean Patrick Floyd Oct 13 '11 at 13:39
public static Calendar firstDayOfLastWeek(Calendar c) {
    c = (Calendar) c.clone();
    // last week
    c.add(Calendar.WEEK_OF_YEAR, -1);
    // first day
    c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, c.getFirstDayOfWeek());
    return c;
}

public static Calendar lastDayOfLastWeek(Calendar c) {
    c = (Calendar) c.clone();
    // first day of this week
    c.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, c.getFirstDayOfWeek());
    // last day of previous week
    c.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, -1);
    return c;
}
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I would go for @maerics answer if third party library is not involved. I have to replace roll() method with add() method as roll will leave the higher field unchanged. e.g., 22nd August will be obtained from 1st August being rolled -7 days. Note the month remain unchanged. The source code goes as below.

public static Calendar[] getLastWeekBounds(Calendar c) {
  int cdow = c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
  Calendar lastMon = (Calendar) c.clone();
  lastMon.add(Calendar.DATE, -7 - (cdow - Calendar.MONDAY));
  Calendar lastSun = (Calendar) lastMon.clone();
  lastSun.add(Calendar.DATE, 6);
  return new Calendar[] { lastMon, lastSun };
}
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same for next week . just replace -7 with 0. –  Saunik Singh Nov 7 '13 at 8:12

You can use the Calendar.roll(int,int) method with arguments Calendar.DATE and an offset for the current day of week:

public static Calendar[] getLastWeekBounds(Calendar c) {
  int cdow = c.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK);
  Calendar lastMon = (Calendar) c.clone();
  lastMon.roll(Calendar.DATE, -7 - (cdow - Calendar.MONDAY));
  Calendar lastSun = (Calendar) lastMon.clone();
  lastSun.roll(Calendar.DATE, 6);
  return new Calendar[] { lastMon, lastSun };
}

This function returns an array of two Calendars, the first being last week's Monday and last week's Sunday.

Wow, the Java date APIs are terrible.

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That's why many people prefer to use a third-party library to handle date and time in Java. –  martin Oct 12 '11 at 15:51
Calendar today  = Calendar.getInstance();
Calendar lastWeekSunday =  (today.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK) == Calendar.SUNDAY) ? today.roll(-7): today.roll(Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, Calendar.SUNDAY - today.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK));
Calendar lastWeekMonday = lastWeekSunday.roll( Calendar.DAY_OF_YEAR, -6 );
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Using Joda:

DateTime input;
DateTime startOfLastWeek = input.minusWeeks(1).minusDays(input.getDayOfWeek()-1);

DateTime endOfLastWeek = input.minusWeeks(1).plusDays(input.getDayOfWeek()+1);

DateTime endOfLastWeek = startOfLastWeek.plusDays(6);

EDIT:

Joda does not allow a different first day of the week, but strictly sticks to the ISO standard, which states that a week always starts on Monday. However, if you need to make that configurable, you could pass the desired first day of the week as a parameter. See the above link for some other ideas.

public DateTime getFirstDayOfPreviousWeek(DateTime input)
{
    return getFirstDayOfPreviousWeek(input, DateTimeConstants.MONDAY); 
}

public DateTime getFirstDayOfPreviousWeek(DateTime input, int firstDayOfWeek)
{
    return new DateTime(input.minusWeeks(1).withDayOfWeek(firstDayOfWeek));
}

public DateTime getLastDayOfPreviousWeek(DateTime input)
{
    return getLastDayOfPreviousWeek(input, DateTimeConstants.MONDAY); 
}

public DateTime getLastDayOfPreviousWeek(DateTime input, int firstDayOfWeek)
{
    return new DateTime(getFirstDayOfPreviousWeek(input, firstDayOfWeek).plusDays(6));
}
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DateTime has a constructor taking a java.util.Calendar-object, so you could use it like this: DateTime input = new DateTime(calendar); –  martin Oct 12 '11 at 15:35
2  
This is utterly wrong. endOflastWeek is always off, except perhaps on Wednesdays and the code does not honour locale-specific rules regarding which week day is the first. –  jarnbjo Oct 12 '11 at 16:00
    
That's right, I posted the wrong version. Fixed that. As for different first days of the week (e.g. Sunday), that's pretty obvious to change and it should be no problem to make it configurable. –  martin Oct 13 '11 at 12:03

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