Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my function. It is a simple one, I'm just not confident on what the answer is.

  int calcul( int n) {
    if(n=1)
      return 1;
    else
      return calcul(n/2) + 1;
  }

Now, to get the complexity, I do:

T(n) = T(n/2) + O(1)

T(n/2) = T(n/4) + O(1)

...

T(1) = O(1)

Now, adding the equations, I'm getting

T(n) = O(1) + O(1)...

so what is the final answer ?

share|improve this question
    
O(1) means the upper bound doesn't depend on the size of the input. If you add two times that each don't depend on the size of the input, you get another time that doesn't depend on the size of the input. So O(1) + O(1) = O(1) - which can't be correct for the function! –  Daniel Earwicker Oct 12 '11 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're executing the function once for each time you can divide n by 2, which is log n times.

So you get O(log n).

Edit:

The logarithm (of base 2) of a number n is the power 2 has to be raised to get n.

That is, 2^(log n) = n, where ^ indicated exponentiation.

Now, a simple way to calculate an approximation of log n is divide n by 2 while n > 1.

If you've divided k times, you get n < 2^k.

Since k - 1 divisions still yielded n > 1, you also have n >= 2^(k-1).

Taking logarithms on each member of 2^(k - 1) <= n < 2^k, you get k - 1 <= log n < k.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, can you just detail it a bit more, I don't get the link between n by 2 and log n. thanks again ! –  CoachNono Oct 12 '11 at 15:50
    
@CoachNono: I've edited my answer. –  Dennis Oct 12 '11 at 16:17
    
Thank you very much ! –  CoachNono Oct 12 '11 at 16:25

The algorithm is very similar to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_algorithm

So, you could read detailed explanations why it's O(log(n))

share|improve this answer

I suggest becoming familiar with the Master theorem. In this case, a=1, b=2 and f=O(1). Since such that f = Theta(1) = Theta(n^(log_2(1) log^k n) = Theta(log^k n) for k = 0, we are in the second case of the theorem and T(n) = Theta(log^(k+1) n) = Theta(log n).

Very handy theorem, and useful in cases when comparing to other algorithms and doing other kinds of analyses aren't so easy.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.