Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When a function runs I need it to check the current system time and if its past 5:00pm to do something.

current_time = datetime.datetime.now()
if current_time > {code to represent 17:00 hours}:
    do stuff

Edit for clarification: Orders are being sent into my software which handles the picking/packing of orders in a distribution center. If the order is sent into the system after 5:00 then that order needs to get flagged so that it isn't "picked" until the following day. So the function needs to be run as orders are "imported"

share|improve this question
    
Far easier would be to use cron or Windows scheduled tasks....... –  David Heffernan Oct 12 '11 at 15:34
    
Orders are being sent into my software which handles the picking/packing of orders in a distribution center. If the order is sent into the system after 5:00 then that order needs to get flagged so that it isn't "picked" until the following day. So the function needs to be run as orders are "imported" –  Ominus Oct 12 '11 at 15:36
4  
This is a typical "I did not read the docs" kind of question: docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#datetime-objects –  patrys Oct 12 '11 at 15:37
    
I don't know why the downvote. simple question with a simple answer; Maybe it's a duplicate, but not of the question linked. –  IfLoop Oct 12 '11 at 15:39
    
@TokenMacGuy - yes, I think both David and I misread the question in the same way ;^) –  Nate Oct 12 '11 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted
if datetime.datetime.now().hour >= 17:
    pass
share|improve this answer
    
I had originally marked TokenMacGuys answer as correct but have switched to this answer simply because it easier to read. –  Ominus Oct 12 '11 at 17:37
    
Dear downvoters, could you please leave a comment? I'd like to learn from my mistakes. –  Chris Wesseling Mar 31 at 14:45

Sure, it's easy:

>>> import datetime
>>> datetime.datetime.now().time()
datetime.time(10, 36, 5, 572343)
>>> datetime.datetime.now().time() >= datetime.time(17,0,0)
False
>>> datetime.datetime.now().time() >= datetime.time(8,0,0)
True
share|improve this answer
    
wow, I sure didn't expect this to be downvoted... I'm not sure I know what's wrong so that I can fix it. Can anyone suggest what I might have done wrong? –  IfLoop Oct 12 '11 at 15:41
    
Both yours' and CharString's answer do exactly what i want. Between the two answers is one "better" then the other or just two different ways to accomplish the same goal? –  Ominus Oct 12 '11 at 15:45
    
well, mine uses the datetime.time class for the comparison. if you like using classes, that's a plus; If you dislike classes, maybe it's a minus. They do the very same thing. –  IfLoop Oct 12 '11 at 15:51
    
Mine is just shorter and simpler. And doesn't have the overhead of creating the time object. Its a little bit faster, but not as much as I expected: 4.1 us vs 4.85 us. So you should go with what reads easiest. –  Chris Wesseling Oct 12 '11 at 16:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.