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I'd like an iterator in C++ that can only iterate over elements of a specific type. In the following example, I want to iterate only on elements that are SubType instances.

vector<Type*> the_vector;
the_vector.push_back(new Type(1));
the_vector.push_back(new SubType(2)); //SubType derives from Type
the_vector.push_back(new Type(3));
the_vector.push_back(new SubType(4)); 

vector<Type*>::iterator the_iterator; //***This line needs to change***

the_iterator = the_vector.begin();
while( the_iterator != the_vector.end() ) {
    SubType* item = (SubType*)*the_iterator;
    //only SubType(2) and SubType(4) should be in this loop.
    ++the_iterator;
}

How would I create this iterator in C++?

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1  
Isn't it possible to make your own iterator (or subclass) that will skip anything but SubType objects? –  Scott M. Apr 21 '09 at 19:49
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You must use a dynamic cast.

the_iterator = the_vector.begin();
while( the_iterator != the_vector.end() ) {
    SubType* item = dynamic_cast<SubType*>(*the_iterator);
    if( item != 0 )
       ... 

    //only SubType(2) and SubType(4) should be in this loop.
    ++the_iterator;
}
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This is a solution to the 'check the proper subtype' part of the question, but it has a flaw in that after reaching the last SubType element it will keep incrementing the iterator beyond the end of the container. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 21 '09 at 20:25
    
dribeas, i don't see how that could ever happen. he's got the right condition at the loop's head. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 21 '09 at 20:35
1  
Original question did not even mention dynamic cast, so I supposed that the poster did not know dynamic casts, and was looking in the wrong direction for the solution (change something related to the iterator). Before suggesting a solution (build your own iterator) that is probably more-than-necessary complex, I prefered to first propose the simpliest way to solve the original problem. Then, as my elipsis and indentation imply, the iterator must not be in the if( item != 0 ) block, of course. –  Jem Apr 21 '09 at 20:37
    
Most reasonable solution. –  Loki Astari Apr 21 '09 at 22:37
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boost filter iterator?

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1  
good answer, wanted to go for it too :) Would be even better with a small example. I would propose BOOST_FOREACH(Type *t, make_pair(make_filter_iterator(ll_dynamic_cast<SubType*>(_1), v.begin(), v.end()), make_filter_iterator(ll_dynamic_cast<SubType*>(_1), v.end(), v.end())) { ... } (using boost.iterators, boost.lambda and boost.foreach) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 21 '09 at 20:18
    
Ah, should've known there was already boost for this! –  Andy Apr 21 '09 at 20:27
    
Great! I felt like there is should be ready to use solution. Thanks. Never know what else has boost. –  Mykola Golubyev Apr 21 '09 at 20:36
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Solution without boost. But if you have an access to the boost library - use Filter Iterator as was proposed.

template <typename TCollection, typename T>
class Iterator
{
public:
    typedef typename TCollection::iterator iterator;
    typedef typename TCollection::value_type value_type;

    Iterator(const TCollection& collection,
             iterator it):
        collection_(collection),
        it_(it)
    {
        moveToNextAppropriatePosition(it_);
    }
    bool operator != ( const Iterator& rhs )
    {
        return rhs.it_ != it_;
    }
    Iterator& operator++()
    {
        ++it_;
        moveToNextAppropriatePosition(it_);
        return *this;
    }
    Iterator& operator++(int);
    Iterator& operator--();
    Iterator& operator--(int);
    value_type& operator*()
    {
        return *it_;
    }
    value_type* operator->()
    {
        return &it_;
    }
private:
    const TCollection& collection_;
    iterator it_;
    void moveToNextAppropriatePosition(iterator& it)
    {
        while ( dynamic_cast<T*>(*it) == NULL && it != collection_.end() ) 
            ++it;
    }
};

class A
{
public:
    A(){}
    virtual ~A(){}
    virtual void action()
    {
        std::cout << "A";
    }
};
class B: public A
{
public:
    virtual void action()
    {
        std::cout << "B";
    }
};
int main()
{
    typedef std::vector< A* > Collection;
    Collection c;
    c.push_back( new A );
    c.push_back( new B );
    c.push_back( new A );

    typedef Iterator<Collection, B> CollectionIterator;
    CollectionIterator begin(c, c.begin());
    CollectionIterator end(c, c.end());

    std::for_each( begin, end, std::mem_fun(&A::action) );
}
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As paintballbob said in a comment, you should create your own iterator class, perhaps inheriting from vector<Type*>::iterator. In particular, you will need to implement or override operator++() and operator++(int) to ensure that you skip non-SubType objects (you can use dynamic_cast<SubType*>() to check each item). There is a nice overview of implementing your own container and iterator in this O'Reilly Net article.

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You must be careful not to increment the iterator beyond the end of the container. For that you will need your wrapper to keep a copy of the 'end' iterator so that you will have a stop condition. That or just use boost::filter_iterator as Sanjaya suggests in another answer. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 21 '09 at 20:21
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Just another way how to do it using boost iterators. This time, using std::remove_copy_if:

std::remove_copy_if(v.begin(), v.end(), 
    boost::make_function_output_iterator(boost::bind(&someFunction, _1)),
    !boost::lambda::ll_dynamic_cast<SubType*>(boost::lambda::_1));

It will call a function (In this example someFunction. But it can be anything boost::bind can construct - also a member-function) for each pointer that's pointing to a SubType.

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