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I have a math website http://finitehelp.com that teaches students Finite Math. I thought it would be cool to include a calculator so I made one for combinations and permutations in Javascript. Live calculator is at http://finitehelp.com/finite-calculator.html. I know next to nothing about Javascript and would venture to guess there is a much more efficient way to write the following particularly because of the excessive use of variables. If someone could please help me I would be very grateful.

<script type="text/javascript">
// calculate n!
Math.factorial = function(n)
{
    if(typeof n == 'string') n = Number(n);
    if(typeof n != 'number' || isNaN(n))
    {
        alert("Factorial requires a numeric argument.");
        return null;
    }
    if (n < 2) return 1;
    return (n * Math.factorial(n-1));
}
Math.divide = function(a,b)
{
    return a/b;
}
</script>

<form class="form" name="combination" action="">
    <p>C(<input type="text" value="n" name="T1" size="1">,<input type="text" value="r" name="T2" size="1">)
    <input type="button" value="Calculate"
     onclick="var n = T1.value; var r = T2.value; var n_minus_r = parseFloat(n) - parseFloat(r); var numerator = Math.factorial(T1.value); var n_minus_r_fact = Math.factorial(n_minus_r); var r_fact = Math.factorial(r); var denominator = n_minus_r_fact * r_fact; T3.value = Math.divide(numerator,denominator); return true;">
    = <input type="text" name="T3" size="12" readonly></p>
</form>
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I believe it will be the most efficient to just assign the task to a student. Think about the extra benefits! Aside from it requiring no effort on your part, the student will also learn new stuff, too, and hopefully maintain and upgrade the code if need arises :D. –  mingos Oct 12 '11 at 16:05
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, here we go!

First of all, why would you ever need to write this?

Math.divide = function(a,b)
{
    return a/b;
}

I would do away with it completely.

You can also clean up your Math.factorial a little bit:

Math.factorial = function(n)
{
    n = Number(n);

    if (isNAN(n)) {
        alert("Factorial requires a numeric argument.");
        return null;
    } else if (n < 2) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return (n * Math.factorial(n - 1));
    }
}

But the main problem is your onclick() code:

onclick="var n = T1.value; var r = T2.value; var n_minus_r = parseFloat(n) - parseFloat(r); var numerator = Math.factorial(T1.value); var n_minus_r_fact = Math.factorial(n_minus_r); var r_fact = Math.factorial(r); var denominator = n_minus_r_fact * r_fact; T3.value = Math.divide(numerator,denominator); return true;

This is way too complicated. I'd make it a function and bind it to the element, which would get rid of all of the crap in your HTML and make it a bit easier to work with:

window.onload = function()
{
    document.getElementById('calculate').onclick = function() {
        var n = T1.value,
            r = T2.value;

        T3.value = Math.factorial(n) / (Math.factorial(r) * Math.factorial(n - r));
    }
}

And just get rid of the onclick= code.

share|improve this answer
    
just mentioned abuot recursive function below. Used your function as base. –  ymutlu Oct 12 '11 at 17:25
    
I noticed that this makes the alert pop up twice. I've tried to do some refactoring. The program has been working for a while now but I thought it would be fun to return to it and see how I can improve it as it was my first program. Thank you so much for your help I had almost given up. The current version is on github gist.github.com/1861120. Any feedback or refactoring would be appreciated. –  Justin May 25 '12 at 19:52
    
I can't find anything wrong with it. Nice job! –  Blender May 25 '12 at 22:58
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If you're concerned about efficiency, you'd probably want to re-implement the factorial as an iterative function rather than a recursive one. The recursive version will use a lot more memory and CPU time than the iterative version.

function factorial(n) { 
  var x=1; 
  var f=1;
  while (x<=n) {
    f*=x; x++;
  }
    return f;
}

You also shouldn't be adding your own functions to the Math namespace. It's not a good habit to get into.

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Math.factorial= function(n){
    var i= n;
    while(--i) n*= i;
    return n;
}

Math.combinations= function(n, r, repeats){
    if(n< r) return 0;
    if(n=== r) return 1;
    if(repeats){
        return Math.factorial(n+r-1)/((Math.factorial(r)*Math.factorial(n-1)));
    }
    return Math.factorial(n)/((Math.factorial(r)*Math.factorial(n-r)));
}


var a= [
    'aqua', 'black', 'blue', 'fuchsia', 'gray', 'green', 'lime', 'maroon',
    'navy', 'olive', 'orange', 'purple', 'red', 'silver', 'teal', 'white',
    'yellow'
]
//how many 3 color combinations are there?
//[red,green,blue] is different than [green,red,blue]
// Math.combinations(a.length,3,true) >>969
// how many unique combinations (ignoring order) are there?
// Math.combinations(a.length,3)>>680
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I would prefer recursive function, tail recursive may cause stackoverflow for functions like fibonacci.

Math._factorial = function(n){
  return Math._fact(n,1);
}

Math._fact= function(n,res){
  n = Number(n);
  if (n == null) {
    alert("Factorial requires a numeric argument.");
    return null;
  } else if (n < 2){
    return res;
  } else {
    return Math._fact(n-1, res*n);
  }
}
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