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I am trying to isolate my HTML from my js by replacing the following

<div id = "foo" onclick="bar(variable)"></div>

with

<div id = "foo"></div>
$(document).ready(function()    {
    $("#foo").click(function(event) {
        bar(???);
    });
});

Now, what would be a good way to transfer the parameter for bar().

Should I merge it with some element id? Or should I declare it as a JS variable using PHP when I load the page? Or is there a better way?

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what is the significance of 29? –  jondavidjohn Oct 12 '11 at 16:12
    
what's wrong with bar(29); –  Joe Oct 12 '11 at 16:12
    
@IAbstractDownvoteFactory it's obtrusive... –  jondavidjohn Oct 12 '11 at 16:14
    
EDITS - consider any variable in place of 29 –  Ramnique Singh Oct 12 '11 at 16:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can put an attribute on the item itself and retrieve that from the click handler.

<div id="foo" data-item="29"></div>

$(document).ready(function()    {
    $("#foo").click(function(event) {
        bar($(this).data("item"));
    });
});

Of course, if you only have one of these, you don't need to abstract the data number, you can just do it like this:

$(document).ready(function()    { 
    $("#foo").click(function(event) { 
        bar(29); 
    }); 
}); 

But, I think we all assumed that you want the 29 to come from the markup so you can use a common click handler on many elements. If that's the case, then the first method accomplishes that.

share|improve this answer
    
yes it's html 5 but people having been doing this method long before the html5 spec. it's not valid html but it works. remember html5's spec is based off of how people broke the rules and what people often did. If you want it to be valid html then add it to the class attribute. this is the most common method used. –  Yamiko Oct 12 '11 at 16:18
1  
What browser do you think this doesn't work in? The convention of using "data-" in front of custom attributes is a convention proposed for HTML5 to prevent conflicts between custom attributes and standard attributes, but it seems to work for me just fine in older browsers. –  jfriend00 Oct 12 '11 at 16:21

Simple - if you're getting the variable using php:

<div id="foo"></div>
$(document).ready(function()    {
    $("#foo").click(function(event) {
        bar( <?= $variable ?> );
    });
});
share|improve this answer

I would suggest the data-attribute as others have suggested. It's not valid html but It works in all browsers that are used today...
the people who prefer to write valid code(not me in this case) like to add data to the class attribute or will just set it in the javascript.

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You could store the parameter as a data attribute:

<div id="foo" data-bar="29"></div>

 

$(document).ready(function()    { 
    $("#foo").click(function(event) { 
        bar($(this).data('bar')); 
    }); 
}); 
share|improve this answer
    
NOTE this is an html5 spec, modern browser required... –  jondavidjohn Oct 12 '11 at 16:15
1  
@jondavidjohn: This is not true. Using jQuery's .data(), any browser can access data-* attributes. –  josh3736 Oct 12 '11 at 16:25
    
it is an html5 spec, but modern browser is not required ... –  3nigma Oct 12 '11 at 16:26

Most people think they need parameters to locate elements that are a sub-element of, or an element with a known path from, the element that was clicked. For that kind of thing the best thing to do is not use a parameter at all, but traverse the DOM from the node that was clicked to find the appropriate element.

$("#foo").click(function(event) {
  var doSomethingTo = $(this).find('div')[0];
  doSomethingTo.hide();
});
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