Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to eliminate the explicit constructor call in Foo and somehow have Bar::len assigned to the size of any of Bar's sub-classes?

class Bar
{
    size_t len_;

    Bar(size_t len) : len_(len) { }
};

class Foo : public Bar
{    
    Foo() : Bar(sizeof(Foo)) { }
};
share|improve this question
    
Oh, I get it. Explicit constructor can a misleading term because of things like explicit Bar(size_t len). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 12 '11 at 16:20
1  
Not that I know of. The Bar subclass has no way of knowing of the size of its most derived type. –  UncleBens Oct 12 '11 at 16:22
1  
How about a virtual member len() that returns sizeof(*this), overridden in every derived class? –  Kerrek SB Oct 12 '11 at 16:52
    
@KerrekSB: Don't virtual functions not work in the constructor/destructor? –  Mooing Duck Oct 12 '11 at 16:55
1  
@MooingDuck: well, there'd be no reason to use the constructor at all in that version... –  Kerrek SB Oct 12 '11 at 16:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could use a "curiously recursive template" to inform the base class of the derived class's type:

template <typename Derived>
class Bar
{
    size_t len_;
protected:
    Bar() : len_(sizeof(Derived)) {}
};

class Foo : public Bar<Foo>
{
};
share|improve this answer
2  
Thats kind of defeats the purpose of inheritance because you can't downcast without knowing the derived type. –  Dani Oct 12 '11 at 16:28
2  
+1 for CRTP. @Dani: The approach can perfectly be applied: class base { int len; base(int l) : len(l) {} }; template <typename T> class base_t : base { base_t() : base( sizeof(T) ) {} }; and then derive all classes from the base_t template, rather than base. There is nothing that cannot be achieved by an extra level of indirection :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 12 '11 at 16:50
    
@Dani: Can you elaborate? I don't really see what downcasting has to do with either my answer, or the "purpose of inheritance". –  Mike Seymour Oct 12 '11 at 16:51
    
The question technically doesn't say "direct subclasses" so I don't think this would work for grandchildren. It works fine for a one-level inheritance though. –  Mark B Oct 12 '11 at 17:20
    
Actually @MikeSeymour's answer fits the bill perfectly - at least for my specific needs! –  chriskirk Oct 12 '11 at 17:41

virtual inheritance might do what you want:

#include <iostream>

class Bar
{
    size_t len_;
public:
    Bar(size_t len) : len_(len) {std::cout << len << '\n';}
};

class Foo : virtual public Bar //virtual inheritance
{    
    size_t foo_bigger_than_bar;
public:
    Foo() : Bar(sizeof(Foo)) { } //Bar only called if Foo is most derived
};

class Derived2: public Foo
{    
    size_t derived2_bigger_than_foo;
public:
    Derived2() : Bar(sizeof(Derived2)), Foo() { }
    // since Foo virtually derives from Bar, we have (get) to 
    // initialize Bar ourselves.
};

int main() {
    Foo f;
    std::cout << '\n';
    Derived2 d;
}

A virtual base class is only initialized by the most derived class. Eg, when creating a Derived2, Foo's constructor will not construct the Bar object, since Derived2 already constructed it. This is key for diamond inheritance, like std::fstream.
Demo here: http://codepad.org/HUlLB4Uq

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I thought the concern was getting the size right, didn't realize it was eliminating the initializer altogeather. Oops. –  Mooing Duck Oct 13 '11 at 23:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.