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Suppose I have a vector that is nested in a dataframe one or two levels. Is there a quick and dirty way to access the last value, without using the length() function? Something ala PERL's $# special var?

So I would like something like:

dat$vec1$vec2[$#]

instead of

dat$vec1$vec2[length(dat$vec1$vec2)]
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I am by no means an R expert, but a quick google turned up this: <stat.ucl.ac.be/ISdidactique/Rhelp/library/pastecs/html/…; There appears to be a "last" function. – benefactual Sep 16 '08 at 21:44
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/q/6136613/946850 – krlmlr Feb 13 '13 at 11:55
1  
MATLAB has the notation "myvariable(end-k)" where k is an integer less than the length of the vector that will return the (length(myvariable)-k)th element. That would be nice to have in R. – EngrStudent Jul 23 '14 at 15:48

10 Answers 10

I use the tail() function:

tail(vector, n=1)

The nice thing with tail() is that it works on dataframes too, unlike the x[length(x)] idiom.

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2  
however x[length(x[,1]),] works on dataframes or x[dim(x)[1],] – kpierce8 Aug 12 '09 at 20:25
14  
Note that for data frames, length(x) == ncol(x) so that's definitely wrong, and dim(x)[1] can more descriptively be written nrow(x). – hadley Aug 13 '09 at 13:33
1  
@hadley - kpierce8's suggestion of x[length(x[,1]),] is not wrong (note the comma in the x subset), but it's certainly awkward. – jbaums Apr 28 '15 at 0:38

If you're looking for something as nice as Python's x[-1] notation, I think you're out of luck. The standard idiom is

x[length(x)]

but it's easy enough to write a function to do this:

last <- function(x) { return( x[length(x)] ) }

This missing feature in R annoys me too!

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16  
x[-1] does perform an arguably more sensible operation in R – James Feb 11 '14 at 15:36
7  
both are sensible or neither are, it's just habit... – PatrickT Dec 13 '14 at 18:56

Combining lindelof's and Gregg Lind's ideas:

last <- function(x) { tail(x, n = 1) }

Working at the prompt, I usually omit the "n=", i.e. tail(x, 1).

Unlike last from the pastecs package, head and tail (from utils) work not only on vectors but also on data frames etc., and also can return data "without first/last n elements", e.g.

but.last <- function(x) { head(x, n = -1) }

(Note that you have to use head for this, instead of tail.)

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I just benchmarked these two approaches on data frame with 663,552 rows using the following code:

system.time(
  resultsByLevel$subject <- sapply(resultsByLevel$variable, function(x) {
    s <- strsplit(x, ".", fixed=TRUE)[[1]]
    s[length(s)]
  })
  )

 user  system elapsed 
  3.722   0.000   3.594 

and

system.time(
  resultsByLevel$subject <- sapply(resultsByLevel$variable, function(x) {
    s <- strsplit(x, ".", fixed=TRUE)[[1]]
    tail(s, n=1)
  })
  )

   user  system elapsed 
 28.174   0.000  27.662 

So, assuming you're working with vectors, accessing the length position is significantly faster.

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1  
Why not testing tail(strsplit(x,".",fixed=T)[[1]],1) for the 2nd case? To me the main advantage of the tail is that you can write it in one line. ;) – mschilli Jul 7 '14 at 16:05

Another way is to take the first element of the reversed vector:

rev(dat$vect1$vec2)[1]
share|improve this answer

I have another method for finding the last element in a vector. Say the vector is a.

> a<-c(1:100,555)
> end(a)      #Gives indices of last and first positions
[1] 101   1
> a[end(a)[1]]   #Gives last element in a vector
[1] 555

There you go!

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I've put the above suggestions through a microbenchmark:

library(microbenchmark)
Rcpp::cppFunction('double last(NumericVector x) { int n = x.size(); return x[n-1]; }')
for (n in c(1e3,1e4,1e5,1e6)) {
  x <- runif(n);
  print(microbenchmark(tail(x,n=1),
                       last(x),
                       x[[end(x)[[1]]]],
                       x[length(x)],
                       rev(x)[[1]]))
}

gives me

Unit: nanoseconds
             expr   min      lq     mean  median      uq   max neval
   tail(x, n = 1) 13412 14908.5 16515.84 16053.0 17145.5 37701   100
          last(x)  2315  3150.0  3791.43  3710.5  4042.0 15603   100
 x[[end(x)[[1]]]] 14850 15810.5 17823.94 17460.0 18485.0 53283   100
     x[length(x)]   250   402.5   472.26   487.0   538.0   878   100
      rev(x)[[1]] 13196 14148.5 15172.17 14680.0 15049.0 28153   100
Unit: nanoseconds
             expr   min      lq     mean  median      uq   max neval
   tail(x, n = 1) 10827 12428.5 14406.98 14902.5 15500.0 33981   100
          last(x)  2024  2758.5  3251.12  3401.5  3627.0  7331   100
 x[[end(x)[[1]]]] 22245 23501.5 24801.37 24683.5 25214.5 61019   100
     x[length(x)]   200   423.0   448.80   469.0   505.5   822   100
      rev(x)[[1]] 72252 74413.5 75059.54 74963.5 75366.5 96632   100
Unit: nanoseconds
             expr    min       lq      mean   median       uq     max neval
   tail(x, n = 1)   8459   9788.0  14901.49  14001.5  16989.0   38781   100
          last(x)   1498   2260.0   3398.24   3062.0   3860.0    8834   100
 x[[end(x)[[1]]]]  95884 103709.0 129822.63 106157.5 109951.5  863248   100
     x[length(x)]    178    342.5    435.49    402.0    479.5     983   100
      rev(x)[[1]] 508216 534723.5 563657.15 550468.5 581428.0 1343420   100
Unit: nanoseconds
             expr     min      lq       mean    median        uq      max neval
   tail(x, n = 1)    8712    9929   27796.53   36659.5   41815.0    51768   100
          last(x)    1446    1979    7650.59    9709.5   10815.0    13343   100
 x[[end(x)[[1]]]] 1222849 1347212 1855905.75 1365886.0 1917885.5 26816272   100
     x[length(x)]     197     339    1246.54    1152.5    1982.5     3377   100
      rev(x)[[1]] 5276699 5306810 7063420.69 5961484.0 5998397.0 30825281   100

In other words: Since anything that isn't O(1) is unacceptable, two solutions are immediately out. In native R, that leaves us with tail(x, n = 1) and x[length(x)]. The former is slower than the latter by a factor of 30. Even the C++ function last (which is rather restrictive and does not handle an empty list properly) is slower than x[length(x)]! So I suggest going with that.

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Whats about

> a <- c(1:100,555)
> a[NROW(a)]
[1] 555
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate that NROW does what you would expect on a lot of different data types, but it's essentially the same as a[length(a)] that OP is hoping to avoid. Using OP's example of a nested vector, dat$vec1$vec2[NROW(dat$vec1$vec2)] is still pretty messy. – Gregor Nov 19 '15 at 19:57

Package data.table includes last function

> library(data.table)
> last(c(1:10))
[1] 10
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1  
This basically boils down to x[[length(x)]] again. – Richard Scriven Jun 7 at 18:53

The dplyr package includes a function last():

> last(mtcars$mpg)
[1] 21.4
share|improve this answer
    
This basically boils down to x[[length(x)]] again. – Richard Scriven Jun 7 at 18:53
    
Similar under the hood, but with this answer you don't have to write your own function last() and store that function somewhere, like several people have done above. You get the improved readability of a function, with the portability of it coming from CRAN so that someone else can run the code. – Sam Firke Jun 7 at 18:58
    
Can also write as mtcars$mpg %>% last, depending on your preference. – Keith Hughitt Jul 4 at 13:23

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