Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Two arrays containing objects, is not returning intersect when using '&' between the arrays. Please take a look at the snippet below:

ruby-1.9.2-p290 :001 > class A
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :002?>   include Comparable
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :003?>   attr_reader :key
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :004?>   def initialize(key)
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :005?>     @key = key
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :006?>     end
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :007?>   def <=> obj
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :008?>     @key <=> obj.key
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :009?>     end
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :010?>   end
 => nil 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :011 > class B
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :012?>   attr_reader :key
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :013?>   def initialize(key)
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :014?>     @key = key
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :015?>     end
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :016?>   end
 => nil 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :017 > A.new(1) == A.new(1)
 => true 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :019 > B.new(1) == B.new(1)
 => false 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :020 > a1 = [A.new(1), A.new(2), A.new(3)]
 => [#<A:0x000001009e2f68 @key=1>, #<A:0x000001009e2f40 @key=2>, #<A:0x000001009e2f18 @key=3>] 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :021 > a2 = [A.new(3), A.new(4), A.new(5)]
 => [#<A:0x000001009d44e0 @key=3>, #<A:0x000001009d44b8 @key=4>, #<A:0x000001009d4490 @key=5>] 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :023 > a1 | a2
 => [#<A:0x000001009e2f68 @key=1>, #<A:0x000001009e2f40 @key=2>, #<A:0x000001009e2f18 @key=3>, #<A:0x000001009d44e0 @key=3>, #<A:0x000001009d44b8 @key=4>, #<A:0x000001009d4490 @key=5>] 
ruby-1.9.2-p290 :024 > a1 & a2
 => [] 

shouldn't a1 & a2 return:

[#<A:0x000001009e2f18 @key=3>]

or, I am just missing something...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, you need to implement hash equality for Array#& and Array#| to work (implementing it only with normal comparisons would be O(n * m)). Notice Array#| returned the wrong result too: it includes duplicates.

Such equality method can be implemented this way :

 def hash
   @key.hash ^ A.hash # just to get a different hash than the key
 end

 alias eql? ==

Also, your <=> fails if the other object doesn't respond to #key. == should not fail, it should return false if the two objects can't be compared. It's also one of those methods where you don't want to use respond_to?, but rather is_a? : you don't want a film to be equal to a book because they happen to have the same title.

def <=>(other)
  @key <=> other.key if other.is_a? A
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for helping to me figure this out... Do we need a XOR in #hash, since I am comparing two A by it's #key. I think, we can keep only @key.hash –  Mohammad Khan Oct 12 '11 at 18:13
    
It would work, because eql? will be called anyway. The xor is just there to avoid collisions with the hash's key. Even def hash; 1; end would work, but performance would be awful. –  Mon ouïe Oct 12 '11 at 18:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.