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This is the source of my page. I'm getting a mysterious CS1002 error. Been looking at this for awhile now and can't figure it out.

<%@ Page language="C#" validateRequest=false %>
<%@ Import Namespace="System.IO" %>
<%@ Import Namespace="System.Text" %>
<%@ Import Namespace="System.Threading" %>
<script language="C#" runat="server">

private void Page_Load (object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
System.IO.Stream str; String strmContents;
Int32 counter, strLen, strRead;
// Create a Stream object.
str = Request.InputStream;
// Find number of bytes in stream.
strLen = Convert.ToInt32(str.Length);
// Create a byte array.
byte[] strArr = new byte[strLen];
// Read stream into byte array.
strRead = str.Read(strArr, 0, strLen);
writeFile(strArr, "images/test.png");
}

 public void writeFile (byte[] data, String fileName)
{
FileStream out = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open);
out.write(data);
out.close();
}

</script>

It's complaining about a semicolon being expected

Compiler Error Message: CS1002: ; expected

Line 24:    FileStream out = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open);
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6  
out is a keyword, I dont think you can use it as a variable name. –  Chad Oct 12 '11 at 17:37
    
@Chad, yeah, the syntax highlighter here on SO gives it away. :) –  bzlm Oct 12 '11 at 17:39
    
My gvim didn't though x.x. So I was so confused and annoyed and now I just feel stupid. –  user798080 Oct 12 '11 at 18:03
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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

out is a keyword, I don't think you can use it as a variable name. Instead try:

public void writeFile (byte[] data, String fileName)
{
    FileStream fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.Open);
    fs.write(data);
    fs.close();
}
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Yup that was it. I'm an idiot x.x. –  user798080 Oct 12 '11 at 18:02
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You cant use out, since it's reserved keyword.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t3c3bfhx%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

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2  
Strictly speaking you can, just prefix with "@". @out can be used as an identifier. –  Richard Oct 12 '11 at 17:43
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