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I have the following validator:

# Source: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/active_record_validations_callbacks.html#custom-validators
# app/validators/email_validator.rb

class EmailValidator < ActiveModel::EachValidator
  def validate_each(object, attribute, value)
    unless value =~ /^([^@\s]+)@((?:[-a-z0-9]+\.)+[a-z]{2,})$/i
      object.errors[attribute] << (options[:message] || "is not formatted properly") 
    end
  end
end

I would like to be able to test this in RSpec inside of my lib directory. The problem so far is I am not sure how to initialize an EachValidator.

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up vote 35 down vote accepted

Here's a quick spec I knocked up for that file and it works well. I think the stubbing could probably be cleaned up, but hopefully this will be enough to get you started.

require 'spec_helper'


describe "EmailValidator" do

  before(:each) do
    @validator = EmailValidator.new({:attributes => {}})
    @mock = mock('model')
    @mock.stub("errors").and_return([])
    @mock.errors.stub('[]').and_return({})  
    @mock.errors[].stub('<<')
  end

  it "should validate valid address" do
    @mock.should_not_receive('errors')    
    @validator.validate_each(@mock, "email", "test@test.com")
  end

  it "should validate invalid address" do
    @mock.errors[].should_receive('<<')
    @validator.validate_each(@mock, "email", "notvalid")
  end  
end
share|improve this answer
    
Works great. Didn't know about mock('model') ill try to learn more about that. – GTDev Oct 12 '11 at 20:01
    
rspec.info/documentation/mocks That is the old RSpec documentation, but the mock constructor remains the same. model is just an identifier for the mock. – Gazler Oct 12 '11 at 20:03
    
You can also do it functionally with factories. – Alex Perrier Mar 22 '12 at 21:37
3  
I think a factory is overkill. We just want an otherwise empty class to contain the errors array. – pduey Oct 5 '12 at 19:03
2  
On newer versions of Rails (I'm using 4.1) you'll need to specify some attributes to your validator to avoid getting an ArgumentError - it doesn't matter what you pass in as long as the attributes aren't empty, so something like @validator = EmailValidator.new({:attributes => { :foo => :bar }}) will do the trick. – alexpls Jun 23 '14 at 12:58

I am not a huge fan of the other approach because it ties the test too close to the implementation. Also, it's fairly hard to follow. This is the approach I ultimately use. Please keep in mind that this is a gross oversimplification of what my validator actually did... just wanted to demonstrate it more simply. There are definitely optimizations to be made

class OmniauthValidator < ActiveModel::Validator
  def validate(record)
    if !record.omniauth_provider.nil? && !%w(facebook github).include?(record.omniauth_provider)
      record.errors[:omniauth_provider] << 'Invalid omniauth provider'
    end
  end
end

Associated Spec:

require 'spec_helper'

class Validatable
  include ActiveModel::Validations
  validates_with OmniauthValidator
  attr_accessor  :omniauth_provider
end

describe OmniauthValidator do
  subject { Validatable.new }

  context 'without provider' do
    it 'is valid' do
      expect(subject).to be_valid
    end
  end

  context 'with valid provider' do
    it 'is valid' do
      subject.stubs(omniauth_provider: 'facebook')

      expect(subject).to be_valid
    end
  end

  context 'with unused provider' do
    it 'is invalid' do
      subject.stubs(omniauth_provider: 'twitter')

      expect(subject).not_to be_valid
      expect(subject).to have(1).error_on(:omniauth_provider)
    end
  end
end

Basically my approach is to create a fake object "Validatable" so that we can actually test the results on it rather than have expectations for each part of the implementation

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1  
I like this because I'm a fan of testing validation through the ActiveModel::Validations module. Otherwise you're tying the test to ActiveModel's implementation which is fragile. – Matt Connolly Jan 22 '14 at 1:06
1  
With Rails 4.1.6, I got ":attributes cannot be blank" until I changed the validates_with call to include the attribute name, e.g. validates_with OmniauthValidator, attributes: 'omniauth_provider' – Wayne Conrad Oct 27 '14 at 17:20
    
With Rails 4.1.7, I was able to get around the ":attribute cannot be blank" error with validates :omniauth_provider, omniauth: true – EricC Sep 24 '15 at 18:43
    
Hey, I would love to see that optimizations! There is not much documentation about validation testing out there. – Daniel Jan 26 at 8:21

One more example, with extending an object instead of creating new class in the spec. BitcoinAddressValidator is a custom validator here.

require 'rails_helper'

module BitcoinAddressTest
  def self.extended(parent)
    class << parent
      include ActiveModel::Validations
      attr_accessor :address
      validates :address, bitcoin_address: true
    end
  end
end

describe BitcoinAddressValidator do
  subject(:model) { Object.new.extend(BitcoinAddressTest) }

  it 'has invalid bitcoin address' do
    model.address = 'invalid-bitcoin-address'
    expect(model.valid?).to be_falsey
    expect(model.errors[:address].size).to eq(1)
  end

  # ...
end
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Using Neals great example as a basis I came up with the following (for Rails and RSpec 3).

# /spec/lib/slug_validator_spec.rb
require 'rails_helper'

class Validatable
  include ActiveModel::Model
  include ActiveModel::Validations

  attr_accessor :slug

  validates :slug, slug: true
end

RSpec.describe SlugValidator do
  subject { Validatable.new(slug: slug) }

  context 'when the slug is valid' do
    let(:slug) { 'valid' }

    it { is_expected.to be_valid }
  end

  context 'when the slug is less than the minimum allowable length' do
    let(:slug) { 'v' }

    it { is_expected.to_not be_valid }
  end

  context 'when the slug is greater than the maximum allowable length' do
    let(:slug) { 'v' * 64 }

    it { is_expected.to_not be_valid }
  end

  context 'when the slug contains invalid characters' do
    let(:slug) { '*' }

    it { is_expected.to_not be_valid }
  end

  context 'when the slug is a reserved word' do
    let(:slug) { 'blog' }

    it { is_expected.to_not be_valid }
  end
end
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