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I always forget to check what's going on in IIS on our webservers, and am wondering: is there some stupid applet or something that always runs locally that I can click on to check event logs and IIS logs on a remote machine?

Mark

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you mean "on a remote machine"? –  TStamper Apr 21 '09 at 20:29
    
What are you looking for in the event logs and IIS logs? The built in Event Viewer in Vista will let you look at a remote server's event logs and filter down to warnings/errors. For IIS logs, I'd need more information about what you're looking for, e.g. 404/500 events, etc. –  boflynn Apr 21 '09 at 20:35
    
I'm mainly looking for unexpected errors in event log. It would be nice to have something running in taskbar so i don't have to go through all the clicks of getting to the buildin event viewer and connecting to the right server(s). –  MStodd Apr 21 '09 at 20:43

2 Answers 2

You can set up samurize to follow the output of the logging on the local and remote machines but it requires some setup.

You can use a remote shell utility such as OpenSSH to connect to remote machines securely.

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One at a time. Compmgmt.msc -> connect to another computer.

But one at a time is boring. Monitoring dozens of machines? I've been using logparser from MS for my log monitoring needs. I run a query that dumps errors and warnings to a csv file a few times a day.

So far, I've only used it to aggregate event logs across the dozen servers in our QA environment, but it appears to take many forms on log input, including IIS. A pseudo log file query (don't have samples with me)

logparser "Select [eventtype], [message] into output.csv FROM \\server1\system, \\server2\system" -i EVT

This shows: You can aggregate multiple servers. You tell it the input format - it supports a dozen log types. You can dump it into a csv file. It looks sort of like SQL. This article in security focus has an IIS log sample.

I'm not an applet type of guy, so I haven't though much about desktop widgets to do this.

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