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I have a state A that I would like to transition to its next state B unconditionally, once the constructor of A has completed. Is this possible?

I tried posting an event from the constructor, which does not work, even though it compiles. Thanks.

Edit: Here is what I've tried so far:

struct A : sc::simple_state< A, Active >
{
    public:
        typedef sc::custom_reaction< EventDoneA > reactions;
        A()
        {
            std::cout << "Inside of A()" << std::endl;
            post_event( EventDoneA() );
        }

        sc::result react( const EventDoneA & )
        {
            return transit< B >();
        }
};

This yields the following runtime assertion failure:

Assertion failed: get_pointer( pContext_ ) != 0, file /includ
e/boost/statechart/simple_state.hpp, line 459
share|improve this question
    
@Downvoter - I wonder how this question, over 3 months after it was asked, could possibly be construed as "not showing any research effort, or it is unclear or not useful" –  nickb Feb 1 '12 at 0:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've updated my OP with my solution, here it is so I can close the question.

The problem is that you cannot inherit from simple_state to achieve the desired transition, you must inherit from state, which then requires that you modify the constructor accordingly.

struct A : sc::state< A, Active >
{
    public:
        typedef sc::custom_reaction< EventDoneA > reactions;
        A( my_context ctx ) : my_base( ctx )
        {
            std::cout << "Inside of A()" << std::endl;
            post_event( EventDoneA() );
        }

        sc::result react( const EventDoneA & )
        {
            return transit< B >();
        }
};
share|improve this answer
    
You should not update the question with the correct answer, just answer the question. People like to see the original issue. –  Gregor Brandt Nov 15 '11 at 1:06
    
@GregorBrandt - My mistake, I've reverted the OP to my original question (I think), which should fix everything. Thanks! –  nickb Nov 15 '11 at 1:14
    
So, basically, you forgot the context? It always helps to explicitly point out what corrections where made. –  Xeo Nov 15 '11 at 1:41
1  
@Xeo Good point! The context is necessary because I was incorrectly inheriting from simple_state, and you need to inherit from state. –  nickb Nov 15 '11 at 1:48

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