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I am using WCF and Sync Framework to synchronize data between SQL 2008 and SQL Ce 3.5. I would like to only send well formed custom faults back to the client should something go wrong on the server. However, the issue I am running into is when one of the Sync Framework methods is the source of the error, my fault is wrapped in a generic "Exception thrown by target of invocation" and returns to the client with the custom fault as the inner exception. As such, the client must catch the error as a generic Exception and then handle the inner exception.

How can I strip off the wrapper exception and just show the real error to the consumer of my service?

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Hook up a custom IErrorHandler to do the exception translation.

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I am having no trouble getting faults that occur within explicitly called WCF methods to return well formed custom faults to the client. The issue is with those WCF methods being called from within Sync Framework. Sync Framework is rethrown my fault after the WCF error handler code has executed so the client only sees the faults wrapped in the rethrown error. This is the behavior I am trying to avoid. –  Michael Kingsmill Oct 13 '11 at 0:17
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You may need to hook into the MSF events to capture the exception and handle it differently within MSF. There is config you can set to have MSF output trace records to help you identify issues as well. –  Rory Primrose Oct 14 '11 at 2:57
    
Rory, thanks for the comment, this helped. In the end, I was able to wrap the call to Synchronize in the SyncAgent and strip out the FaultException and only raise that to the client application. –  Michael Kingsmill Oct 18 '11 at 20:49

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