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Is there a way to use a Tuple class, but supply the names of the items in it?

For example:

public Tuple<int, int, int int> GetOrderRelatedIds()

That returns the ids for OrderGroupId, OrderTypeId, OrderSubTypeId and OrderRequirementId.

It would be nice to let the users of my method know which is which. (When you call the method, the results are result.Item1, result.Item2, result.Item3, result.Item4. It is not clear which one is which.)

(I know I could just create a class to hold all these Ids, but it these Ids already have their own classes they live in and making a class for this one method's return value seems silly.)

share|improve this question
    
You're gonna have to roll your own - Tuple is very generic, so that's all you get – BrokenGlass Oct 12 '11 at 20:12
    
NO you cannot do like that , see this link for more information msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/ee957397 – Enigma State Oct 12 '11 at 20:15
1  
I would venture to say that using a Tuple as a public facing datatype for your api may not be recommended. I typically use Tuple for short lived internal things not as a return value of a API. – Mike Burdick Jan 12 '15 at 20:24
    
Vote for this feature there: visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio-2015/… – Abatonime Apr 6 at 14:09
    
It is in the working list of C# 7 See github.com/dotnet/roslyn/issues/347 – Philip Ding Apr 20 at 8:23
up vote 34 down vote accepted

No, there is not a way to do this short of defining your own type.

share|improve this answer

Here is an overly complicated version of what you are asking:

class MyTuple : Tuple<int, int>
{
    public MyTuple(int one, int two)
        :base(one, two)
    {

    }

    public int OrderGroupId { get{ return this.Item1; } }
    public int OrderTypeId { get{ return this.Item2; } }

}

Why not just make a class?

share|improve this answer
    
would struct be better in this case instead of Class? – deathrace May 28 '15 at 13:32
4  
The slight advantage I see of this is that it automatically implements the equals operator, checking that 2 instances are equal if the items are all equal. – JSoet Jun 23 '15 at 17:12
4  
Another drawback to this approach is that Item1 and Item2 are still public properties on MyTuple – RJFalconer Sep 11 '15 at 13:01

With .net 4 you could perhaps look at the ExpandoObject, however, don't use it for this simple case as what would have been compile-time errors become run-time errors.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        dynamic employee, manager;

        employee = new ExpandoObject();
        employee.Name = "John Smith";
        employee.Age = 33;

        manager = new ExpandoObject();
        manager.Name = "Allison Brown";
        manager.Age = 42;
        manager.TeamSize = 10;

        WritePerson(manager);
        WritePerson(employee);
    }
    private static void WritePerson(dynamic person)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} is {1} years old.",
                          person.Name, person.Age);
        // The following statement causes an exception
        // if you pass the employee object.
        // Console.WriteLine("Manages {0} people", person.TeamSize);
    }
}
// This code example produces the following output:
// John Smith is 33 years old.
// Allison Brown is 42 years old.

Something else worth mentioning is an anonymous type for within a method, but you need to create a class if you want to return it.

var MyStuff = new
    {
        PropertyName1 = 10,
        PropertyName2 = "string data",
        PropertyName3 = new ComplexType()
    };
share|improve this answer

If the types of your items are all different, here is a class I made to get them more intuitively.

The usage of this class:

var t = TypedTuple.Create("hello", 1, new MyClass());
var s = t.Get<string>();
var i = t.Get<int>();
var c = t.Get<MyClass>();

Source code:

public static class TypedTuple
{
    public static TypedTuple<T1> Create<T1>(T1 t1)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1>(t1);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2> Create<T1, T2>(T1 t1, T2 t2)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2>(t1, t2);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3> Create<T1, T2, T3>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3>(t1, t2, t3);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4>(t1, t2, t3, t4);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5, T6 t6)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5, T6 t6, T7 t7)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7);
    }

    public static TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8> Create<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8>(T1 t1, T2 t2, T3 t3, T4 t4, T5 t5, T6 t6, T7 t7, T8 t8)
    {
        return new TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8>(t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7, t8);
    }

}

public class TypedTuple<T>
{
    protected Dictionary<Type, object> items = new Dictionary<Type, object>();

    public TypedTuple(T item1)
    {
        Item1 = item1;
    }

    public TSource Get<TSource>()
    {
        object value;
        if (this.items.TryGetValue(typeof(TSource), out value))
        {
            return (TSource)value;
        }
        else
            return default(TSource);
    }

    private T item1;
    public T Item1 { get { return this.item1; } set { this.item1 = value; this.items[typeof(T)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2> : TypedTuple<T1>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2)
        : base(item1)
    {
        Item2 = item2;
    }

    private T2 item2;
    public T2 Item2 { get { return this.item2; } set { this.item2 = value; this.items[typeof(T2)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3> : TypedTuple<T1, T2>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3)
        : base(item1, item2)
    {
        Item3 = item3;
    }

    private T3 item3;
    public T3 Item3 { get { return this.item3; } set { this.item3 = value; this.items[typeof(T3)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4)
        : base(item1, item2, item3)
    {
        Item4 = item4;
    }

    private T4 item4;
    public T4 Item4 { get { return this.item4; } set { this.item4 = value; this.items[typeof(T4)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4)
    {
        Item5 = item5;
    }

    private T5 item5;
    public T5 Item5 { get { return this.item5; } set { this.item5 = value; this.items[typeof(T5)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5, T6 item6)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4, item5)
    {
        Item6 = item6;
    }

    private T6 item6;
    public T6 Item6 { get { return this.item6; } set { this.item6 = value; this.items[typeof(T6)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5, T6 item6, T7 item7)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4, item5, item6)
    {
        Item7 = item7;
    }

    private T7 item7;
    public T7 Item7 { get { return this.item7; } set { this.item7 = value; this.items[typeof(T7)] = value; } }
}

public class TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7, T8> : TypedTuple<T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6, T7>
{
    public TypedTuple(T1 item1, T2 item2, T3 item3, T4 item4, T5 item5, T6 item6, T7 item7, T8 item8)
        : base(item1, item2, item3, item4, item5, item6, item7)
    {
        Item8 = item8;
    }

    private T8 item8;
    public T8 Item8 { get { return this.item8; } set { this.item8 = value; this.items[typeof(T8)] = value; } }
}
share|improve this answer

No, you can't name the tuple members.

The in-between would be to use ExpandoObject instead of Tuple.

share|improve this answer

I think I would create a class but another alternative is output parameters.

public void GetOrderRelatedIds(out int OrderGroupId, out int OrderTypeId, out int OrderSubTypeId, out int OrderRequirementId)

Since your Tuple only contains integers you could represent it with a Dictionary<string,int>

var orderIds = new Dictionary<string, int> {
    {"OrderGroupId", 1},
    {"OrderTypeId", 2},
    {"OrderSubTypeId", 3},
    {"OrderRequirementId", 4}.
};

but I don't recommend that either.

share|improve this answer

What you are looking for is an anonymous type if it's used locally. Otherwise just define a new class

share|improve this answer

You Can write a class that contains the Tuple.

You need to override the Equals and GetHashCode functions

and the == and != operators.

class Program
{
    public class MyTuple
    {
        private Tuple<int, int> t;

        public MyTuple(int a, int b)
        {
            t = new Tuple<int, int>(a, b);
        }

        public int A
        {
            get
            {
                return t.Item1;
            }
        }

        public int B
        {
            get
            {
                return t.Item2;
            }
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj)
        {
            return t.Equals(((MyTuple)obj).t);
        }

        public override int GetHashCode()
        {
            return t.GetHashCode();
        }

        public static bool operator ==(MyTuple m1, MyTuple m2)
        {
            return m1.Equals(m2);
        }

        public static bool operator !=(MyTuple m1, MyTuple m2)
        {
            return !m1.Equals(m2);
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var v1 = new MyTuple(1, 2);
        var v2 = new MyTuple(1, 2);

        Console.WriteLine(v1 == v2);

        Dictionary<MyTuple, int> d = new Dictionary<MyTuple, int>();
        d.Add(v1, 1);

        Console.WriteLine(d.ContainsKey(v2));
    }
}

will return:

True

True

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