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I'm wondering about conventions and best practices regarding the packaging of predicate functors. For example, given a class like:

class Timer
{
public:
  Timer(const std::string& name, int interval);
  bool nameIs(const std::string& name) const;
private:
  std::string name_;
  int interval_;
};

that is (in one case) used in class TimerVec:

class TimerVec
{
public:
  typedef std::vector<Timer>::iterator iterator;``
  <... ctors, etc ...>
  iterator findByName(const std::string& name);
private:
  std::vector<Timer> timers_;
};

and has a predicate functor like:

class TimerNameIs
{
public:
  TimerNameIs(const std::string& name) : name_(name) {}
  bool operator()(const Timer& t) { return t.nameIs(name_); }
private:
  const std::string& name_;
};

I can think of a number of places to put the functor code, some being:

  1. In the header file immediately following the declaration of Timer
  2. Nested inside Timer (i.e. so the ref becomes Timer::TimerNameIs)
  3. Nested inside TimerVec (currently the only user)
  4. In an anonymous namespace ahead of the implementation for TimerVec::findByName (again the only place it's used)

While any of these would be adequate I'm rather drawn to #2, but it's not something I've ever seen done. Are there any concrete reasons favoring a particular option?

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2  
If it is only used by one function, I'd use #4 for the time being. In fact it is possible that you don't need a functor at all (C++11 lambda etc). If you discover other uses later, it should be simple to refactor. - I would definitely not use #3 or any other option that would force unrelated code to be recompiled if I choose to refactor. –  UncleBens Oct 12 '11 at 20:57
    
@UncleBens The lambda would clearly be the best solution, were it available in this case. But +1 because I should've thought of it, but didn't. –  rlduffy Oct 12 '11 at 21:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is open to debate. I prefer to create a nested class. This way a functor that is intended only to work with a particular type of object is namespace-scoped within that object.

I also generally name the predicate match_xxx where xxx is the parameter I'm matching on.

To wit:

class Timer
{
  // ...
public:
  class match_name : public std::unary_function<Timer, bool>
  {
  public:
    match_name(const std::string& name) : name_(name) {}
    bool operator()(const Timer& t) { return t.nameIs(name_); }
  private:
    const std::string& name_;
  };
};

...which is utilized thusly:

std::find_if( v.begin(), v.end(), Timer::match_name("Flibbidy") );

I prefer this method because the semantics of Timer::match_name("Flibbidy") are exceedingly clear when looking at this code 6 months later.

I also am careful to derive my functor from std::unary_function (although my derivation above might have the parameters reversed).

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I knew any answer would be debatable, but your reasoning is sound. And the advice to derive from unary_function is spot-on. All this and you confirmed my bias :) –  rlduffy Oct 12 '11 at 21:34

Me, personally, in it's own header and cpp files. Using #include "Timer.h" in the TimerNameIsheader file:

#include "Timer.h"
#include <string>

class TimerNameIs
{
    public:
        TimerNameIs(const std::string& name) : name_(name) {}
        bool operator()(const Timer& t) { return t.nameIs(name_); }
    private:
        const std::string& name_;
};

Doing this, you isolate Timer and TimerNameIs from one to the other.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 'cause I should've considered this also, but didn't. The style of the project is that related classes are grouped into source files. Also I'm not a big fan of the Java-style one-class-per-source-file model. The fact of the matter is that Timer and TimerNameIs are inexorably coupled, so why not have the source grouping acknowledge that? –  rlduffy Oct 12 '11 at 21:18
    
@rlduffy so, use second option. This way TimeVec can use it without problems. Thinking in future developments and uses, don't use 3rd option. –  Tio Pepe Oct 12 '11 at 21:25

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