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Before I begin, I'd like to say that the database structure is set and is not able to be changed. I have to work with the structure that I'm provided. So please don't suggest I change the database. =)

I have this database for an online game. This game has a "skill tree", where each skill has "prerequisite" skills that you must obtain to unlock it. Each prereq skill might have it's own prereq skills, and so on. Depth is not fixed, it can go 6 or 7 levels deep.

So, lets say I have this skill tree, which is required to fire torpedoes:

Torpedos
|- Missile Launcher Operation 
|- Heavy Missiles
   |- Standard Missiles

(it also includes some redundant prerews, like Standard Missiles require Missile Launcher Operation. Those left out for simplicity)

Due to the nature of the database, I was thinking about making a stored procedure that recurses through the skill tree. Every skill has an ID associated with it and a number of prereqs (no parents tho). This is my current SQL query:

SELECT
IFNULL(SkillName.valueInt,SkillName.valueFloat) AS SkillID,
items.typeName AS Skill
FROM dgmtypeattributes AS SkillName
INNER JOIN dgmtypeattributes AS SkillLevel ON SkillLevel.typeID = SkillName.typeID AND SkillLevel.attributeID IN (277, 278, 279, 1286, 1287, 1288)
INNER JOIN invtypes  AS items ON IFNULL(SkillName.valueInt,SkillName.valueFloat) = items.typeID
WHERE SkillName.typeID = SKILLID AND
((SkillName.attributeID = 182 AND
SkillLevel.attributeID = 277) OR
(SkillName.attributeID = 183 AND
SkillLevel.attributeID = 278) OR
(SkillName.attributeID = 184 AND
SkillLevel.attributeID = 279) OR
(SkillName.attributeID = 1285 AND
SkillLevel.attributeID = 1286) OR
(SkillName.attributeID = 1289 AND
SkillLevel.attributeID = 1287) OR
(SkillName.attributeID = 1290 AND
SkillLevel.attributeID = 1288))

Don't worry about the fluff, the main thing here is the SKILLID. If I were to put 3325 (the ID for Torpedoes) in place of SKILLID, it would return:

+---------+----------------------------+
| SkillID | Skill                      |
+---------+----------------------------+
|    3319 | Missile Launcher Operation |
|    3324 | Heavy Missiles             |
+---------+----------------------------+

If I were to put in 3324 (ID for heavy missiles), it would return:

+---------+----------------------------+
| SkillID | Skill                      |
+---------+----------------------------+
|    3321 | Standard Missiles          |
+---------+----------------------------+

So, basically, I need to loop through these queries and use the SkillID's from the previous results in the new query, eventually coming to an end. I will also need a new column, parent, to designate which skillID is the parent for the row.

Problem is, I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to stored procedures. I've read up on them and I still don't know how to go about doing this.

I can easily do this with PHP and a few SQL queries, but I wanted to try my hand at procedures for a change of pace. Can anyone start me on the right foot here? =)


UPDATE 1

I've got this function, but it is showing an error:

#1172 - Result consisted of more than one row

when using this query:

SELECT  test2(typeID) AS id, @level AS level
FROM    (
    SELECT  @start_with := 3325,
    @id := @start_with,
    @level := 0
) vars, dgmtypeattributes
WHERE   @id IS NOT NULL

Here is the function:

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS test2;
CREATE FUNCTION test2(value INT) RETURNS INT
NOT DETERMINISTIC
READS SQL DATA
BEGIN
        DECLARE _id INT;
        DECLARE _parent INT;
        DECLARE _next INT;
        DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET @id = NULL;

        SET _parent = @id;
        SET _id = -1;

        IF @id IS NULL THEN
                RETURN NULL;
        END IF;

        LOOP
                SELECT 
                    MIN(valueInt) AS id, CONCAT(@path, ',', MIN(valueInt))
                INTO @id, @path
                FROM `dgmtypeattributes` 
                WHERE 
                    typeID = _parent
                    AND attributeID > 181 
                    AND attributeID < 185
                    AND valueInt    > _id;

                IF @id IS NOT NULL OR _parent = @start_with THEN
                        SET @level = @level + 1;
                        RETURN @id;
                END IF;
                SET @level := @level - 1;

                SELECT  _parent, SUBSTRING_INDEX(@path, ',', -1)
                INTO    _id, _parent
                FROM    `dgmtypeattributes`
                WHERE   typeID = _parent;
        END LOOP;
END

I believe that the second select that starts with SELECT _parent, SUBSTRING_INDEX(@path, ',', -1) is the one returning multiple rows... It is highly probable that I am not providing the correct query and getting my values mixed up. That second select - what is is supposed to return?

TABLE EXPLAINATION

Also, since it's hard to work with imaginary data, here's a link to the two tables I'm using (that actual data table and a table that simply links IDs with Names): http://www.2shared.com/file/17uFmKXc/sqlFile.html

I don't expect anyone to make heads or tails of the data. A LOT of it is extra stuff that isn't even related to the problem at hand (for example, the invTypes table -- it contains not only the 'skills' but every single item in the entire game).

Quick rundown: dgmtypeattributes is a table that defines the attributes for various items in the game. These attributes include the 'prerequisite' skills needed to use said item, and those attribute IDs are 182 - 184. So if you search for 3325 in typeID (the torpedo skill) with attribute ranges from 182 - 184 (to query prereq attributes) it'll come back with:

mysql> SELECT * FROM `dgmtypeattributes` WHERE typeID = 3325 AND attributeID >181 AND attributeID <185;
+--------+-------------+----------+------------+
| typeID | attributeID | valueInt | valueFloat |
+--------+-------------+----------+------------+
|   3325 |         182 |     3319 |       NULL |
|   3325 |         183 |     3324 |       NULL |
+--------+-------------+----------+------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

The two values under valueInt are the ID for the prereq skills (Missile Launcher Operation and Heavy Missiles).


Solution

Been playing around with it some more today, and I think I finally figured it out. I basically had to write out the entire flow of the function since MySQL doesn't really provide any way to debug these things =/

I'm still refining it, but this is what I've got so far:

CREATE FUNCTION test2(value INT) RETURNS INT
NOT DETERMINISTIC
READS SQL DATA
BEGIN


        DECLARE _id INT;
        DECLARE _parent INT;
        DECLARE _next INT;
        DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND SET @id = NULL;

        SET _parent = @id;
        SET _id = -1;

        IF @id IS NULL THEN
                RETURN NULL;
        END IF;

        LOOP
                SELECT 
                    MIN(valueInt) AS id, IF(MIN(valueInt), CONCAT(@path, ',', _parent), @path)
                INTO @id, @path
                FROM `dgmtypeattributes` 
                WHERE 
                    typeID = _parent
                    AND attributeID > 181 
                    AND attributeID < 185
                    AND valueInt    > _id;

                IF @id IS NOT NULL OR _parent = @start_with THEN
                        SET @level = @level + 1;
                        SET @parent = _parent;
                        RETURN @id;
                END IF;

                IF @path = '' THEN
                    RETURN NULL;
                END IF;

                SET @level := @level - 1;

                SELECT  _parent, SUBSTRING_INDEX(@path, ',', -1), SUBSTRING(@path, 1, (LENGTH(@path)-(LENGTH(SUBSTRING_INDEX(@path, ',', -1)) +1)))
                INTO    _id, _parent, @path;
        END LOOP;
END

Result:

SELECT  test2(typeID) AS id, @level AS level
FROM    (
    SELECT  
        @start_with := 3325,
        @id := @start_with,
        @level := 0,
    @path := ''
) vars,dgmtypeattributes
WHERE   @id IS NOT NULL

+------+-------+
| id   | level |
+------+-------+
| 3319 |     1 |
| 3324 |     1 |
| 3319 |     2 |
| 3321 |     2 |
| 3319 |     3 |
| NULL |     1 |
+------+-------+
6 rows in set (0.09 sec)

Again, some things to tweak out (NULL is returning when it shouldn't, and I need to include a parent column) but all in all I've got it working!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Normally, you could use an approach described in this article:

, just bear in mind that the prerequisites are (counter-intuitively) children, that is both heavy missiles and missile launchers are the children of torpedoes, not parents.

However, there are two problems with your model:

First, you have your relationships in two tables (items and dgmtypeattributes which seems to be an EAV) rather than one.

This is not a big problem and can be easily worked around. Just replace

SELECT  MIN(id)
INTO    @id
FROM    t_hierarchy
WHERE   parent = _parent
        AND id > _id;

with an equivalent query which would return "the first child with id greater that _id, in id order".

Second, your lineage is not a tree, that is an item can have multiple parents.

This is a problem, since the procedure does not keep the recursion stack and instead just traverses the tree in both directions. Since there can be multiple directions, the equivalent of the following query:

SELECT  id, parent
INTO    _id, _parent
FROM    t_hierarchy
WHERE   id = _parent;

would not know which direction to follow (is the parent which led to this item stored in 277 or 278 or in other attribute)?

However, the procedure can be rewritten by storing the actual recursion path in a comma-separated session variable. Just rewrite the query with your equivalent of this:

SELECT  MIN(id), CONCAT(@path, ',', MIN(id))
INTO    @id, @path
FROM    t_hierarchy
WHERE   parent = _parent
            AND id > _id;

, and replace the second query (which selects the parent) with

SELECT  _parent, SUBSTRING_INDEX(@path, ',', -1)
INTO    _id, _parent
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your informative response. I think I may now understand what actually is going on much better. However, I've still run into problems, mostly me not understanding exactly what the SELECT statement are supposed to return and thus not providing the correct query for them. I've update my original post to include the function that I'm working with, and also a packet of data that can be used. Looking forward to more of you replies, they are very helpful =) –  Ryan Oct 14 '11 at 4:47
    
I got it working! Thank you so much for the help and step in the right direction, you rock! BTW, do you know of anyway to debug stored functions besides frying your brain trying to follow the flow of logic? =) –  Ryan Oct 14 '11 at 20:58
    
@Ryan: forge.mysql.com/wiki/… –  Quassnoi Oct 14 '11 at 21:10

Instead of storing a parent id try representing your tree as a nested set. Give it a left and a right value. Now you have a node A with two children B and C and C has two children, D and E. Now imagine visiting each node twice and assigning them numbers, once down the left side and once up the right. When you are going up the right and hit a branch, go down it's left. leaf nodes get two sequential numbers. Then go back up until you hit the root a second time.

A left:1 right:8 B left:2 right:7 C left:3 right:4 D left:5 right:6

now, to find a leaf, you just look for a node with a right-left=1. to find ancestors of D, look for a node WHERE left > right-1 AND left < D.left AND right > D.right

CREATE PROCEDURE getancestors (@nodename NVARCHAR(50))
    BEGIN
      SELECT nodeID, left, right
      FROM mytree
      WHERE left > right-1 AND left < (SELECT left FROM mytree WHERE nodeID=@nodename) 
        AND right > (SELECT right FROM mytree WHERE nodeID=@nodename) 
      ORDER BY left;
    END;

This will give you the result from parent to your node. To ascend the tree from your node, order by right. Just remember, in a nested set, all children's left values are greater than and right values are less than the parent. The only problems with this technique are if you need to do frequent insertions.

Assuming the example above, to get the ancestors of D, invoke it as:

CALL getancestors("D");

Good luck and happy coding ;-}

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. I'm aware of the nested set, but I don't think I really need that much control. I simply need to recurse through the tree, add any children to the result while appending the parent ID. Even still, your solution would still require making a loop and recursing through the tree to determine the values -- my main problem. Remember: I am not able to change the database variables, add columns, or otherwise change structure, so the solution needs to be on-the-fly. If I'm going to need to recurse just to get left and right values, I may as well use what I've already got. =) –  Ryan Oct 12 '11 at 23:48
    
No recursion needed. Only a single pass through the table is required to retrieve a subtree, a node and it's ancestors, all leaf nodes, etc. Trees and Heirarchies in SQL by Joe Celko compares the different models in detail. He recommends the nested set model for most trees, because most queries are simpler and faster. Nothing to do with control. The main problem with nested sets is renumbering frequent insertion trees. There are several problems with adjacency lists including lack of normalization and multiple self joins to retrieve branches. Your hierarchy is what nested sets are meant for. –  Sinthia V Oct 13 '11 at 19:00
    
@SinthiaV: nested sets won't work here since the model is not a tree. An item can have more than one parent (prerequisite) and more than one child technology. Nested sets only allow trees. –  Quassnoi Oct 13 '11 at 19:16

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