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http://codepad.org/8fJG5XaB

Need a little help creating hashrefs of hashrefs, with the last key as a reference to an array.

use Data::Dumper;

   my $foo = "a:b:c:d:a";
   my $bar = "a:b:c:d:z";
   my $hoh = {};

   sub createHash {

      my ($hoh,$orig,$rest,$last) = @_;
      $rest = $rest || $orig;
      $_    = $rest;

      if (/^(.*?):(.*)$/) { 
         $hoh->{$1} = $hoh->{$1} || {};
         createHash($hoh->{$1},$orig,$2,$1);
      }
      elsif (defined($last)) {
         push (@{$hoh->{value}} , [$rest,$orig]);
      }

      return $hoh;
   }

   $hoh = createHash($hoh,$foo,undef);
   $hoh = createHash($hoh,$bar,undef);

   print Dumper($hoh);

What's Wanted:

$VAR1 = {
          'a' => {
                   'b' => {
                            'c' => {
                                     'd' => [
                                               [
                                                 'a',
                                                 'a:b:c:d:a'
                                               ],
                                               [
                                                 'z',
                                                 'a:b:c:d:z'
                                               ]
                                            ]
                                   }
                          }
                 }
        };

You can compare this with the output from codepad. Notice the subtle difference; instead of 'd' being a hashref that has an arrayref value, 'd' is the arrayref and there is no value.

share|improve this question
    
in the least clever way possible to create that... my $var = { }; $var->{a}{b}{c}{d} = [ [ 'a', 'a:b:c:d:a' ], [ 'z', 'a:b:c:d:z' ] ]; not posting as an answer because I'm sure this is not as simple as what you've posted. or in all honesty, not really sure what you're trying to do. –  xenoterracide Oct 15 '11 at 2:07
    
However, jdporter on PerlMonks came up with something similar (automated), using eval. That's what I was asking Tank about –  vol7ron Oct 15 '11 at 15:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd suggest Data::Diver, though it is a bit awkward since it wants to always create scalar references at the end, and that's not what we want. Thus, I cheat a bit.

The main thing here is that we can save effort (mostly in maintenance) by deciphering all the keys at once, and using a while loop (inside Data::Diver) instead of recursion, which is, by its nature, a bit more fun to decipher :-) Combine that with the fact that even if it were recursion, it'd be hidden in a nice, neat function call, it's a double win :-)

use Data::Dumper;
use Data::Diver qw(DiveRef);

my $foo = "a:b:c:d:a";
my $bar = "a:b:c:d:z";
my $hoh = {};

sub add_item
{
    my $href = shift;
    my $str  = shift;

    my @keys = split /:/, $str;

    # force an array to be autovivified if it isn't already there.
    # (this is kinda cheating)
    my $cheat  = DiveRef($href, @keys[0..$#keys-1], 0);
    my $ref = DiveRef($href, @keys[0..$#keys-1]);

    # if we cheated (thus $$cheat will be undef), we need to pop that
    # off.
    pop @$$ref unless $$cheat;

    # store this at the end.
    push @{$$ref}, [ $keys[-1], $str ];

    return;
}

add_item($hoh, $foo);
add_item($hoh, $bar);
print Dumper($hoh);

Hope that helps,

UPDATE: After conversing with tye, he provided a more concise way to do this. It uses Data::Diver still, but has a much simpler workaround embedded. (His claim is that perl has a bug here with :lvalue subs and push - I don't know better, so I'll take his word.)

use Data::Dumper;
use Data::Diver qw(DiveRef DiveVal);

my $foo = "a:b:c:d:a";
my $bar = "a:b:c:d:z";
my $hoh = {};

sub add_item
{
    my $href = shift;
    my $str  = shift;

    my @keys= split /:/, $str;
    my $last= pop @keys;
    push @{ DiveVal( $href, \( @keys ) ) ||= []}, [ $last, $str ];


    return;
}

add_item($hoh, $foo);
add_item($hoh, $bar);
print Dumper($hoh);
share|improve this answer
    
+1, but codepad didn't have Diver installed, so I'll have to test that out on my homebox. Could you take a look at my answer and see if I'm too far off. –  vol7ron Oct 12 '11 at 22:56
    
Also, would you say this is a bad approach? Should I just keep it as HoH? –  vol7ron Oct 12 '11 at 23:02
    
jdporter did that to dynamically create perl code that would be what you want - though I suspect it wouldn't quite work, but is a quick-and-easy way to do most of your work. As for if this is a bad approach, that really depends. I've had nested hashes deeper than this before, and I've left them flattened as well. All depends on what you want to do afterward. –  Tanktalus Oct 12 '11 at 23:25
    
nested hashes are fine, but arrays at the end of the nested hash make things less robust. I'm thinking if there's ever a case that you have something like 'a:b:e', it'll try to add an array to the hashref. Mind you the lengths are the same for now, but I don't know if the project scope may change (but that's a problem separate from what I've asked) –  vol7ron Oct 13 '11 at 1:07
perl -MData::Dumper -F: -anle'($p,$l)=splice@F,-2,2;$x=\$h;$x=\($$x->{$_}||={})for@F;push@{$$x->{$p}||=[]},[$l=>$_]}{print Dumper($h)' <<EOI
a:b:c:d:a
a:b:c:d:z
a:b:c:d:f
EOI
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for golf technique :) –  vol7ron Oct 12 '11 at 22:54

Change

push (@{$hoh->{value}} , [$rest,$orig]);

to

push (@{$hoh->{$last}} , [$rest,$orig]);

EDIT: Sorry, I was a little slow on the uptake but I finally see what's wrong with my answer. If you're still interested, you're original code was very close. A couple of tweaks got it working:

use Data::Dumper;

my $foo = "a:b:c:d:a";
my $bar = "a:b:c:d:z";
my $hoh = {};

sub createHash {

    my ($hoh,$orig,$rest,$last) = @_;
    $rest = $rest || $orig;
    $_    = $rest;

    if (/^(.?):(.+)$/) {
        $_ = $1;
        $rest = $2;
        if ($rest =~ /:/) {
            $hoh->{$_} = $hoh->{$_} || {};
            createHash($hoh->{$_},$orig,$rest,$_);
        } else {
            push(@{$hoh->{$_}}, [$rest, $orig]);
        }
    }

    return $hoh;
}

$hoh = createHash($hoh,$foo,undef);
$hoh = createHash($hoh,$bar,undef);

print Dumper($hoh);
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work. $hoh overwrites itself to the last hashref in the chain, so you'd have a double 'd' and you can't do @{$hoh} = [...] because you're trying to change the hashref to an arrayref. –  vol7ron Oct 13 '11 at 1:02
    
It works fine. Paste it into a file, change value to $last, and run it yourself... –  MisterEd Oct 13 '11 at 16:04
    
codepad.org/Odo711t6 - as you can see there are two keys with the value d, that's because the last $hoh is equal to $hoh->{$last} (and it's already a hashref so you can't turn it into an array). –  vol7ron Oct 13 '11 at 19:08

No recursion necessary: http://codepad.org/XsMCDW2y

use Data::Dumper;
my $hoh = {};

   foreach my $str ('a:b:c:d:a','a:b:c:d:z'){      
      my @vals    = split /:/,$str;
      my $hr      = $hoh;
      my $lastkey = @vals[-2];

      for (0..$#vals-2){
         $hr->{$vals[$_]}= $hr->{$vals[$_]} || {};
         $hr=$hr->{$vals[$_]};
      }
      if (defined $lastkey){
         push @{$hr->{$lastkey}}, [@vals[-1], $str];
      }
   }

print Dumper($hoh);

After looking back at Hynek's, I think we're using a similar approach


Or using recursion: http://codepad.org/xVPuCO1N

use Data::Dumper;

   my $foo = "a:b:c:d:a";
   my $bar = "a:b:c:d:z";
   my $hoh = {};

   sub createHash {
      my ($hoh,$str_orig,$str_rest,$lastkey,$parent) = @_;

      $str_rest = $str_rest || $str_orig || "";
      $_        = $str_rest;

      if (/^(.*?):(.*)$/)
      {
         $parent    = $hoh;
         $hoh->{$1} = $hoh->{$1} || {};
         createHash($hoh->{$1},$str_orig,$2,$1,$parent);
      }
      elsif (defined($lastkey))
      {
         delete($parent->{$lastkey}) if ref $parent->{$lastkey} ne "ARRAY";
         push (@{$parent->{$lastkey}} , [$str_rest,$str_orig]);
      }
      return $hoh;
   }
   $hoh = createHash($hoh,$foo);
   $hoh = createHash($hoh,$bar);

   print Dumper($hoh);
share|improve this answer

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