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I'm reading Learn You a Haskell for Great Good, and I never know how to pronounce the Haskell operators. Do they have "real" names? ?

For instance, how do you read aloud an expression like this one?

Just (+3) <*> Just 9

I know that >>= is "bind", but what about the others? Since Google doesn't take non-alphanumeric characters into account, it's kind of hard to do an efficient search...

I realize you can create your own operators, so of course not all operators can have names, but I expect that the common ones (e.g. those defined in Applicative or Monad) must have names...

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Its a good question, and I'm not aware of any answers. Perhaps we need a naming scheme, or perhaps library authors should provide pronounceable names as part of Haddock docs. –  Paul Johnson Oct 12 '11 at 21:42
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Very good question. Usually I read <*> as "apply" and <$> as "fmap". As for the others I have no idea. –  DuoSRX Oct 12 '11 at 21:46
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Is this a duplicate of "Haskell: How is <*> pronounced?"? Even if it isn't, its answers are probably worth checking out. –  Antal S-Z Oct 12 '11 at 21:46
    
@DuoSRX, thanks for the suggestions, they seem to make sense. Your comment could be an answer btw ;) –  Thomas Levesque Oct 12 '11 at 21:57
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Also, check out the Haskell wiki's page on pronunciation. It's incomplete, but relevant. –  Antal S-Z Oct 12 '11 at 22:33
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4 Answers

up vote 71 down vote accepted

Here is how I pronounce them:

>>=     bind
>>      then
*>      then
->      to                a -> b: a to b
<$>     (f)map
<$      map-replace by    0 <$ f: "f map-replace by 0"
<*>     ap(ply)           (as it is the same as Control.Monad.ap)
$                         (none, just as " " [whitespace])
.       pipe to           a . b is read as "b pipe-to a"
!!      index
!       index
<|>     or / alternative  expr <|> term: "expr or term"
++      concat / plus / append
[]      empty list
:       cons
::      of type / as      f x :: Int: f x of type Int
\       lambda
@       as                go ll@(l:ls): go ll as l cons ls
~       lazy              go ~(a,b): go lazy pair a, b
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33  
to me, (.) is "compose". –  luqui Oct 12 '11 at 22:13
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I usually rather pronounce (.) as of and ($) as applied to : f . g . h $ x is hence read f of g of h applied to x. But I understand divergence in this point of view! –  Ptival Oct 12 '11 at 22:21
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I think pronouncing (.) as "after" is more sensible. Composition can be denoted in two directions, and calling it "after" immediately explains how it works, too. –  Rhymoid Oct 12 '11 at 23:05
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@luqui That's an edge-case. I would just remove the infinite loop to solve the problem. –  FUZxxl Oct 13 '11 at 0:05
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Then the pronunciation of those symbols is also not the same. I should have clarified when calling it "after" makes sense, which is indeed hard to define. Programming languages are not natural languages. The designers of COBOL tried to ignore that and obviously failed. –  Rhymoid Oct 13 '11 at 10:45
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My personal favorites are "left fish" (<=<) and "right fish" (>=>). Which are just the left and right Kleisli composition of monads operators. Compose fishy, compose!

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4  
Compose into one big school. –  Tyr Oct 20 '11 at 13:47
    
Jesus wins. Haskell loses. –  Thomas Eding Oct 24 '11 at 20:29
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@trinithis: I don't understand the joke...no good joke could possibly end really meaning that Haskel loses. :) –  Robert Massaioli Oct 25 '11 at 12:49
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| sym  | pronunciation                                    |
|------|--------------------------------------------------|
| |    | "such that"                                      |
| <-   | "is drawn from"                                  |
| =    | "is defined to be" / "is defined as"             |
| ::   | "has type" / "of type" / "is of type"            |
| ->   | "a function that takes ... and returns a ..." /  |
|      |                          "function that maps" /  |
|      |                          "is a function from" /  |
|      |                                          "to"    |
| $    | "apply"                                          |
| _    | "whatever"                                       |
| !!   | "index"                                          |
| ++   | "concat"                                         |
| []   | "empty list"                                     |
| :    | "cons"                                           |
| \    | "lambda"                                         |
| =>   | "implies" / "then"                               |
| *>   | "then"                                           |
| < $> | "fmap" / "dollar cyclops"                        |
| < $  | "map-replace by"                                 |
| <*>  | "ap" / "star cyclops"                            |
| .    | "pipe to" / "compose" / "dot"                    |
| <|>  | "or"                                             |
| @    | "as"                                             |
| ~    | "lazy"                                           |
| <=<  | "left fish"                                      |
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1  
Thanks for your answer. "dollar cyclop" made me laugh :) –  Thomas Levesque May 28 '13 at 22:13
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Cyclops is singular, you don't need to drop the s. :) –  Rahul Narain Jan 5 at 11:43
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+      plus
-      minus (OR negative for unary use)
*      multiply OR times
/      divide
.      dot OR compose
$      apply OR of
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5  
These ones are quite obvious... My question was about the more unusual operators like <*>, >>... –  Thomas Levesque Oct 12 '11 at 22:04
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For completeness. –  Thomas Eding Oct 12 '11 at 22:06
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