Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to extend a class, then use a method from base class, but i can't see it.

My Code:

class A {
    protected void Foo(){}
}

class B : A {}

class C{
    void Bar(){
         B b = new B();
         b.Foo();
    }
}

How could i use b.Foo in C?

share|improve this question
    
Did you mean for C to inherit from A as well? If so, the code still won't compile. See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/tags/protected for articles as to why. –  dlev Oct 12 '11 at 21:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't. Foo is a protected member function of class A, and as such can only be used from within class A, or from within a class that inherits from it.

class A 
{
   protected int x() {}
}

class B : A 
{
   void F() 
   {
      A a = new A();  
      B b = new B();  
      a.x();   // Error
      b.x();   // OK
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't b.x(); yield an error in your example? –  CheeseSucker Oct 12 '11 at 22:01
    
Well, in fact i'm trying to extend System.Windows.Shapes.Line with 2 more variable. The real code: public class Edge : Line { <my variables> public Edge(....) { .... } } But when i use it, i can't see it's methods or fields, even if they public. –  gberes Oct 12 '11 at 22:04
1  
You'd think! But this is actually ok. Instantiations of a class within the same class have such priveleges. –  ZacAttack Oct 12 '11 at 22:06
    
I don't think you can use Line as a base class for your Edge class because it's sealed. Look here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  ZacAttack Oct 12 '11 at 22:13
    
@ZacAttack I didn't know that! I could've sworn it would use the public interface. I just tested it, and it works for both instances created in the function, as well as instances passed as arguments. –  CheeseSucker Oct 12 '11 at 22:14

You can only see protected method from the within the descendant classes.

C doesn't inherit from B so, by definition, it cannot see its protected methods.

share|improve this answer

You need to mark Foo with the public modifier rather than protected because C does not inherit B; it "uses" B.

See here for more information.

share|improve this answer

Make it public. Foo() will only be visible to A and its derived classes (like 'B'). C is not a derived class of A.

share|improve this answer

You must make the method Foo public.

class A {
    public void Foo() {}
}

class B : A {}

class C {
    void Bar(){
         B b = new B();
         b.Foo(); // Works
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
To whomever, why the downvote? (Have +1'd to offset it!) –  Reddog Oct 12 '11 at 21:53

Because Foo is protected it's can't be seen to anything except derived classes.

To expose it you need to do:

class A 
{
    protected void Foo(){}
}

class B : A 
{
    public new void Foo()
    {
        base.Foo()
    }
}

Other answers have touched on this but none mention the use of the new keyword to expose the method with the same name, but different accessibility.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.