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Complete C newb here. Trying to learn/understand pointers by messing with simple code fragments.

#include <stdio.h>

void swap(int *px, int *py)
{
    int tmp;
    tmp = *px;
    *px = *py;
    *py = tmp;
}

main()
{
    int *a, *b;
    *a = 1;
    *b = 2;
    swap(&a,&b);
    printf("%d %d\n", *a, *b);
}

Why is this not valid? The code works when I remove the dereferencing operator * from main.

Conceptually, this seems like it should work. I initialize a and b as pointers which point to int 1 and int 2, respectively. I then send their addresses to swap(), which should switch what they point to.

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4  
If you compile with all warnings (as you always should), you should have got a type conversion warning, since the type of &a is int**. –  Kerrek SB Oct 12 '11 at 22:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There are a couple of problems. First, the pointers a and b are not pointing to valid memory. So the assignment of the integer values is undefined (possible crash). Secondly, the call to swap (assuming a and b are pointing to valid memory) should not include the address (it is currently sending the address of the pointer variable).

The following changes would make it work:

int a, b;
a = 1;
b = 2;
swap(&a,&b);
printf("%d %d\n", a, b);
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"the pointers a and b are not pointing to valid memory". Why don't they point to some place in the memory where int 1 and int 2 are stored? –  babonk Oct 12 '11 at 22:49
1  
Integer literals such as 1 and 2 aren't stored in memory; they have no address. –  John Bode Oct 12 '11 at 23:02
    
@babonk: *a = 1 says take the bit of memory a points to and put the value 1 in that bit of memory. So even if the 1 in the above program took up some memory, you are not asking to assign that memory location to a. And the constant 1 does not take up any memory, &1, getting the address for the constant 1 is either invalid, or undefined. –  Shannon Severance Oct 12 '11 at 23:02
    
Super newb question: If integers aren't in memory, how are they represented/used/stored when the computer is running the program? e.g. 100 + 1. Doesn't that require the integers 100 and 1 being in memory? –  babonk Oct 13 '11 at 0:14
1  
@babonk most compilers will optimize 100+1 to 101 anyway, but it would store the numbers 100 and 1 inside the program, instead of on the stack or heap. If compilers allowed you to get the address of parts of your program, by &100, then the programmer might accidentally do something like *((&100) + 1) which would probably overwrite part of your running program. This would lead to almost impossible to track down bugs. –  jgon Oct 13 '11 at 0:43

The swap() function is OK but inside main you are taking the addresses of pointers, so you're passing int** arguments to int* parameters.

int *a, *b;
swap(&a,&b);

To fix it, replace the code in main() with :

int a = 1, b = 2;
swap(&a,&b);
printf("%d %d\n", a, b);
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To clarify, I was mistakenly sending a pointer to a pointer, instead of a pointer to a variable? –  babonk Oct 12 '11 at 22:52
1  
@babonk: exactly. You had 1 indirection-level too many. –  Henk Holterman Oct 12 '11 at 22:54

Pointers point to data. A pointer itself doesn't comprise memory for storage, it just points to existing memory. So when you declare int *a; , you just have a garbage pointer with no useable value, and you mustn't dereference it.

The only sensible way to use pointers is to assign them the address-of something (or the result of some allocation function):

int i;
int *a = &i;  // now a points to i

Therefore, the right way to use your swap function is to pass it addresses of integers:

int i = 10;
int j = -2;

swap(&i, &j);
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a and b are uninitialized pointers, dereferencing them induces undefined behavior. You want:

int main() {
    int a, b;
    a = 1;
    b = 2;
    swap(&a,&b);
    printf("%d %d\n", a, b);
    return 0;
}
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Your method signature is wrong. You ask for two pointers to int, yet you pass in two pointers to pointers to int.

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When you say, " I then send their addresses to swap(), which should switch what they point to." Are you trying to change the address values within the pointer variables in main, to switch which bit of memory they are pointing to? In that case you will need another step of redirection:

#include <stdio.h>

void swap(int **px, int **py) {
  int *tmp;
  tmp = *px;
  *px = *py;
  *py = tmp;
}

int main (void) {
  int x, y; /* storage to point to */
  int *a, *b;

  a = &x;
  b = &y;

  *a = 1;
  *b = 2;

  printf("(*a, *b, x, y) == (%d, %d, %d, %d)\n", *a, *b, x, y);
  swap(&a, &b);
  printf("(*a, *b, x, y) == (%d, %d, %d, %d)\n", *a, *b, x, y);
}

$ ./a.out
(*a, *b, x, y) == (1, 2, 1, 2)
(*a, *b, x, y) == (2, 1, 1, 2)

The x & y values have not changed, but a was pointing to x and now points to y and vice versa for b.

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