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My application is a Java Web server application running with -Xrs to ignore console logoff signals.

Requests coming in call a custom JNI method which calls a method of a third-party DLL file. Subsequent requests also call this same method.

Apparently the third-party DLL inserts a console control handler to listen for console logoff or shutdown events. Once the DLL is loaded to memory, if someone logs in via

mstsc /admin

or

mstsc /console

and then logs off, the signal is heard by the third-party DLL file and the Web Server is killed.

In order to prevent this, I wrote a question here on Stack Overflow, which explains how I went about resolving the issue. I call

SetConsoleCtrlHandler( (PHANDLER_ROUTINE) CtrlHandler, TRUE );

immediately after the third-party DLL file does its business.

To me, this means there is some point in time when the third-party DLL file sets the control handler, then leaves and does not unset it, and I have to override it with my own control handler.

The information I used to create this code was found in the MSDN article Registering a Control Handler Function.

I am asking the following

  1. Is there a way I can simply PREVENT additional control handlers from being added? Perhaps some code prior to calling the third-party DLL file?

  2. Barring that, is there a way to simply remove the prior handler added to the stack? I have no idea what the prior handler was or how to get a list of handlers.

  3. Based on this code, am I and the third-party DLL file creating a potential memory leak by constantly one-upping each other by adding additional control handlers?

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This is the classic "I want to be the topmost window" question. You are paying good money to use somebody's DLL. Assuming you're playing by the rules. That somebody has an email address, a phone, customer support options. Get in touch and work something out. –  Hans Passant Oct 12 '11 at 23:26
    
My plan of action for today was to contact the third party and explain the situation in detail. They came back and told me our service contract with them expired some time ago, but the higher-ups are negotiating. Meanwhile, I've narrowed down the call to one of 5 particular third-party methods and asked this question as I thought maybe there was a programmatic way to prevent new additions to the stack rather than just replace it with my own addition. Also still not sure if causing a memory leak due to this. –  JoshDM Oct 13 '11 at 21:46
    
Contacted the third party; we are still under contract, but they want me to update to a newer version to diagnose (which still causes the problem) but are charging us additional for the licenses since it is a new version. Forget it, I'm ditching their library for another that does the same thing that we have support for; more coding on my part, but saving money in the long run. –  JoshDM Oct 19 '11 at 20:16
    
I still would like to know how I can prevent additional handlers from being placed on the stack. –  JoshDM Oct 23 '11 at 7:21
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