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For example I have the variable 3.545555555, which I would want to truncate to just 3.54.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 31 down vote accepted

If you want that for display purposes, use java.text.DecimalFormat:

 new DecimalFormat("#.##").format(dblVar);

If you need it for calculations, then: Math.floor(value * 100) / 100

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12  
This will not display a truncated 3.545555555 to 3.54, but rounded to 3.55. DecimalFormat.setRoundingMode() needs to be set to RoundingMode.FLOOR; –  Christian García Jan 7 '13 at 13:26
    
this doesn't work for me Math.floor(9.62 * 100) / 100 gives 9.61 –  Mani Jan 30 at 21:30
DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat(fmt);
df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.DOWN);
s = df.format(d);

Check available rounding mode.

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Note first that a double is a binary fraction and does not really have decimal places.

If you need decimal places, use a BigDecimal, which has a setScale() method for truncation, or use DecimalFormat to get a String.

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Bit Old Forum, None of the above answer worked for both positive and negative values ( I mean for the calculation and just to do truncate without Rounding). From the How to round a number to n decimal places in Java link

private static BigDecimal truncateDecimal(double x,int numberofDecimals)
{
    if ( x > 0) {
        return new BigDecimal(String.valueOf(x)).setScale(numberofDecimals, BigDecimal.ROUND_FLOOR);
    } else {
        return new BigDecimal(String.valueOf(x)).setScale(numberofDecimals, BigDecimal.ROUND_CEILING);
    }
}

This method worked fine for me .

System.out.println(truncateDecimal(0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.62, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.621, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.629, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.625, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.0, 2));

Results :

0.00
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.99
-9.99
-9.00
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Maybe Math.floor(value * 100) / 100? Beware that the values like 3.54 may be not exactly represented with a double.

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You can use NumberFormat Class object to accomplish the task.

// Creating number format object to set 2 places after decimal point
NumberFormat nf = NumberFormat.getInstance();
nf.setMaximumFractionDigits(2);            
nf.setGroupingUsed(false);

System.out.println(nf.format(precision));// Assuming precision is a double type variable
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If, for whatever reason, you don't want to use a BigDecimal you can cast your double to an int to truncate it.

If you want to truncate to the Ones place:

  • simply cast to int

To the Tenths place:

  • multiply by ten
  • cast to int
  • cast back to double
  • and divide by ten.

Hundreths place

  • multiply and divide by 100 etc.

Example:

static double truncateTo( double unroundedNumber, int decimalPlaces ){
    int truncatedNumberInt = (int)( unroundedNumber * Math.pow( 10, decimalPlaces ) );
    double truncatedNumber = (double)( truncatedNumberInt / Math.pow( 10, decimalPlaces ) );
    return truncatedNumber;
}

In this example, decimalPlaces would be the number of places PAST the ones place you wish to go, so 1 would round to the tenths place, 2 to the hundredths, and so on (0 rounds to the ones place, and negative one to the tens, etc.)

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Maybe following :

double roundTwoDecimals(double d) { 
      DecimalFormat twoDForm = new DecimalFormat("#.##"); 
      return Double.valueOf(twoDForm.format(d));
}  
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See the other answers. You can't do it reliably if the answer is to be represented in floating point. –  EJP Oct 12 '11 at 23:57

A quick check is to use the Math.floor method. I created a method to check a double for two or less decimal places below:

public boolean checkTwoDecimalPlaces(double valueToCheck) {

    // Get two decimal value of input valueToCheck 
    double twoDecimalValue = Math.floor(valueToCheck * 100) / 100;

    // Return true if the twoDecimalValue is the same as valueToCheck else return false
    return twoDecimalValue == valueToCheck;
}
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I have a slightly modified version of Mani's.

private static BigDecimal truncateDecimal(final double x, final int numberofDecimals) {
    return new BigDecimal(String.valueOf(x)).setScale(numberofDecimals, BigDecimal.ROUND_DOWN);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.62, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.621, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.629, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.625, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(3.545555555, 2));

    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(9.0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.62, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.621, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.629, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.625, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.999, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-9.0, 2));
    System.out.println(truncateDecimal(-3.545555555, 2));

}

Output:

0.00
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.62
9.99
9.00
3.54
-9.62
-9.62
-9.62
-9.62
-9.99
-9.00
-3.54
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