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To aid in serializing to JSON, I commonly build a class that inherits from the python dict class. If the class is supposed to have specific fields, I want there to be methods to get & set.

Currently, I construct a class like:

class MyRequest(dict):
    def __init__(self, firstName=None, lastName=None):
        self['firstName'] = firstName
        self['lastName'] = lastName

    def get_firstName(self):
        return self['firstName']
    def set_firstName(self, firstName):
        self['firstName'] = firstName

    def get_lastName(self):
        return self['lastName']
    def set_lastName(self, lastName):
        self['lastName'] = lastName

But this is really cumbersome to work with. Since the underlying 'storage' is a dictionary, I can't just access fields like

myReq.firstName = "Foo"
print myReq.lastName

But is there a way to get to there while still keeping the dict backing?

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Are you looking for something like Storage, Namespace? –  J.F. Sebastian Oct 13 '11 at 0:53
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a way to do what you want. Use properties:

class MyRequest(dict):
    def __init__(self, firstName=None, lastName=None):
        self['firstName'] = firstName
        self['lastName'] = lastName

    @property
    def firstName(self):
        return self['firstName']

    @firstName.setter
    def firstName(self, firstName):
        self['firstName'] = firstName

    @property
    def lastName(self):
        return self['lastName']

    @lastName.setter
    def lastName(self, lastName):
        self['lastName'] = lastName

request = MyRequest('John', 'Connor')
print request.firstName, request.lastName
request.firstName = 'Sarah'
print request.firstName, request.lastName
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There's almost no good reason nowadays to use UserDict. Subclassing dict works fine. –  Remy Blank Oct 13 '11 at 0:10
    
Yes, thanks. UserDict is left for backward compatibility with python 2.2 and older. –  refaim Oct 13 '11 at 0:31
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How about:

class MyRequest(dict):
    def __init__(self, firstName=None, lastName=None):
        self['firstName'] = firstName
        self['lastName'] = lastName

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        return self[name]

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        self[name] = value

Note that this may come back to haunt you, in the case where one of your attributes has the same name as a dict method (e.g. update). In that case, getting the attribute will return the method, and setting it will overwrite the method. This may be difficult to debug.

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1  
You could use hasattr to return the actual dict attribute if it exists, or try and return the actual dict attribute and catch the exception to override it. –  Zack Bloom Oct 13 '11 at 0:11
    
Or you could use composition rather than inheritance. –  Wallacoloo Oct 13 '11 at 0:18
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