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I want to create a string based on the value passed as argument to the MACRO FUNCTION. Something Like:

#define ABC(x,y) return "anystr_x_y.tar.bz2"
main()
{
   a = ABC(2,3);
}

So Finally, It should return "anystr_2_3.tar.bz2"

I was wondering how to create that string with the value passed as argument to MACRO fnc.

Any help ! thanks !

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Define your macro like this, using the "stringize operator":

#define ABC(x,y) "anystr_" #x "_" #y ".tar.bz2"
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I though it was ## for token concat. Or is #x not concat but something else? –  David Heffernan Oct 13 '11 at 6:45
    
@DavidHeffernan # is stringize. On my compiler the concatenation is done automatically (no need for ##). I thought it was standard ? –  cnicutar Oct 13 '11 at 6:47
2  
Thank you. I've just learnt something. I'm sure it is standard, I asked the question out of ignorance on my part! –  David Heffernan Oct 13 '11 at 6:50
2  
It's because strings are a special case, they are always automatically concatenated. When you write x = "ABC" "DEF"; it is the same thing as writing x = "ABCDEF"; –  Lundin Oct 13 '11 at 6:51
    
Thanks! I was using ## operator instead of #. –  mujahid Oct 13 '11 at 6:52

Macros don't return stuff, since they are not functions. They are merely token replacement functionality. What you actually want is a though one, and in your place I would do it with a function instead. However, a solution could look like:

#define ABC(x,y) "anystr_" #x "_" #y ".tar.bz2"

This takes leverage from the fact that string literals are collapsed togheter, so "Hello " "World!" is interpreted as "Hello World!".

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Wasn't this tagged C ? –  cnicutar Oct 13 '11 at 6:44
    
@cnicutar: The Boost Preprocessor library is based in the preprocessor, which is shared between C and C++. –  K-ballo Oct 13 '11 at 6:46
    
Correct, however, why using boost stringize, when plain standard stringize would do? "anystr_" #x "_" #y ".tar.bz2" –  Suma Oct 13 '11 at 6:47
    
I didn't know about the Boost preprocessor library and didn't know it works for C :-) –  cnicutar Oct 13 '11 at 6:49
    
@Suma: Because I wasn't aware of such functionality. I will update my answer. –  K-ballo Oct 13 '11 at 6:50

There is no such thing as a macro function in C (nor C++). Macros are processed by the preprocessor, before the code is compiled. Your example code above will be processed by the compiler to this:

main()
{
  a = return "anystr_x_y.tar.bz2"
}

To achieve what you are trying to do, you need to tell the preprocessor to concattenate x, y and the constant parts of your string. You do that using the ## operator, e.g.:

#define ABC(x,y) ("anystr_" ## x ## "_" ## y ## ".tar.bz2")

That will result in the following code being passed to the compiler:

main()
{
  a = ("anystr_2_3.tar.bz2")
}
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2  
That would result in an error unless x and y are specified as "2" and "3". –  K-ballo Oct 13 '11 at 6:43
    
Yes, this is probably the most one can get from a macro. Othen the concatenation there is almost nothing you can do in preprocessor. However, you goo concat wrong, you need to use stringize instead, concatenation is done automatically on strings:("anystr_" #x "_" #y ".tar.bz2") –  Suma Oct 13 '11 at 6:45
    
## is the token pasting operator... not stringizing. It should be using the single # on the parameter. –  Jeff Mercado Oct 13 '11 at 6:47
    
@e8johan: Thank you very much for your valuable briefing. Thats what i was looking for ! –  mujahid Oct 13 '11 at 6:49

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