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I have a function that returns information in seconds, but I need to store that information in hours:minutes:seconds. Is there an easy way to convert the seconds to this format in python?

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8  
The inverse of this problem can be found at How to convert an H:MM:SS time string to seconds in Python? – hughes Jun 19 '11 at 14:21
up vote 232 down vote accepted

By using the divmod() function, which does only a single division to produce both the quotient and the remainder, you can have the result very quickly with only two mathematical operations:

m, s = divmod(seconds, 60)
h, m = divmod(m, 60)
print "%d:%02d:%02d" % (h, m, s)
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12  
+1 for divmod. It's made for situations like this. – John Fouhy Apr 21 '09 at 23:47
3  
I edited your answer to include a link to the documentation, as it is encouraged to do whenever possible. – Paolo Bergantino Apr 22 '09 at 9:00
2  
If you prefer operators over functions, use the modulo; for example (only minutes/seconds) : '%d:%02dmn' % (seconds / 60, seconds % 60) – bufh May 20 '14 at 14:47
6  
And you can extend it to days: d, h = divmod(h, 24). – Mark Ransom Oct 3 '14 at 14:47
3  
@MarkRansom: and then to months m, d = divmod(m, 31). Oooops, no, you can't. Worse, your code will be wrong if leap seconds come into the game. Long story short: use timedelta and don't mess with the calendar, it will bite you. – Tibo Jun 2 '15 at 14:08

or you can do

>>> import datetime
>>> str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=666))
'0:11:06'
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3  
Very nice - I'll have to keep that one in my toolbox – Smashery Apr 21 '09 at 23:48
3  
This is the best way, IMHO, as you can then use arithmetic on the timedelta and any datetime objects. – Matthew Schinckel Apr 22 '09 at 3:13
5  
divmod() wins. see below. – fiorix Sep 18 '12 at 15:23
5  
This is inconsistent even for seconds expressed as floats. 666.0 -> 0:11:06, but 666.1 -> 0:11:06.100000 – anatoly techtonik Jul 1 '14 at 9:34
4  
This works for multiple days: str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=60*60*24+1)) = '1 day, 0:00:01' – incognick Dec 29 '14 at 15:37

I can hardly name that an easy way (at least I can't remember the syntax), but it is possible to use time.strftime, which gives more control over formatting:

>>> import time
>>> time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(666))
'00:11:06'

gmtime is used to convert seconds to special tuple format that strftime() requires.

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Well, the answer is actually provided here - stackoverflow.com/questions/1384406/… – anatoly techtonik Jul 1 '14 at 10:15
2  
Unfortunately this method starts measuring days from 1 so it isn't designed to represent time delta, and so it is an accident waiting to happen. For example with time.strftime('%d %H:%M:%S', time.gmtime(1)) => '1 day, 0:00:01'. – Riaz Rizvi Jan 1 at 21:49
>>> "{:0>8}".format(datetime.timedelta(seconds=66))
>>> '00:01:06' # good

and:

>>> "{:0>8}".format(datetime.timedelta(seconds=666777)
>>> '7 days, 17:12:57' # nice

without ':0>8':

>>> "{}".format(datetime.timedelta(seconds=66))
>>> '0:01:06' # not HH:MM:SS

and:

>>> time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.gmtime(666777))
>>> '17:12:57' # wrong

but:

>>> "{:0>8}".format(datetime.timedelta(seconds=620000))
>>> '7 days, 4:13:20' # bummer
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it fails if the delta is less than a second: "{:0>8}".format(timedelta(milliseconds=66)) '0:00:00.066000' – J.F. Sebastian Sep 12 '15 at 12:21

This is how I got it.

def sec2time(sec, n_msec=3):
    ''' Convert seconds to 'D days, HH:MM:SS.FFF' '''
    if hasattr(sec,'__len__'):
        return [sec2time(s) for s in sec]
    m, s = divmod(sec, 60)
    h, m = divmod(m, 60)
    d, h = divmod(h, 24)
    if n_msec > 0:
        pattern = '%%02d:%%02d:%%0%d.%df' % (n_msec+3, n_msec)
    else:
        pattern = r'%02d:%02d:%02d'
    if d == 0:
        return pattern % (h, m, s)
    return ('%d days, ' + pattern) % (d, h, m, s)

Some examples:

$ sec2time(10, 3)
Out: '00:00:10.000'

$ sec2time(1234567.8910, 0)
Out: '14 days, 06:56:07'

$ sec2time(1234567.8910, 4)
Out: '14 days, 06:56:07.8910'

$ sec2time([12, 345678.9], 3)
Out: ['00:00:12.000', '4 days, 00:01:18.900']
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What is the advantage of this over the answer above? str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=666)) – Riaz Rizvi Jan 1 at 21:38

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