Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference between the two?

Invoke((MethodInvoker) delegate {
        checkedListBox1.Items.RemoveAt(i);
        checkedListBox1.Items.Insert(i, temp + validity);
        checkedListBox1.Update();
    }
);

vs

Invoke((MethodInvoker)
    (
        () => 
        {
            checkedListBox1.Items.RemoveAt(i);
            checkedListBox1.Items.Insert(i, temp + validity);
            checkedListBox1.Update();
        }
    )
);

Is there any reason to use the lambda expression? And is (MethodInvoker) casting delegate and lambda into type MethodInvoker? What kind of expression would not require a (MethodInvoker) cast?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

1) The lambda expression is somewhat shorter and cleaner

2) Yes

3) You could use the Action type, like this:

Invoke(new Action(
    () => 
    {
        checkedListBox1.Items.RemoveAt(i);
        checkedListBox1.Items.Insert(i, temp + validity);
        checkedListBox1.Update();
    }
)
);
share|improve this answer
    
I see, the Action type. Any differences in using the Action type vs casting? –  Jack Oct 13 '11 at 7:27
    
here is a discussion about action vs methodinvoker: stackoverflow.com/questions/1167771/… –  hcb Oct 13 '11 at 9:57
    
Was not aware of this, thanks mate! –  TheGateKeeper Jul 9 at 10:44

The two approaches are equivalent. The first is known as an anonymous method, and is an earlier .net 2.0 capability. The lambda should not require a cast.

I would prefer the lambda, because it has more ubiquitous use in modern C#/.net development. The anonymous delegate does not offer anything over the lambda. The lambda allows type inference, which ranges from convenient to necessary in some cases.

share|improve this answer

MethodInvoker provides a simple delegate that is used to invoke a method with a void parameter list. This delegate can be used when making calls to a control's Invoke method, or when you need a simple delegate but do not want to define one yourself.

an Action on the other hand can take up to 4 parameters.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.