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I got:

int number = 1255; -> //It could also be 125(1€25Cent) or 10(10Cent) or 5(5Cent)

public double toMoney(int number)
{
...
}

as return, I want the double number: 12.55 or if input: 10 then: 00.10

I know that I can do with Modulo something like this:

1255 % 100.. to get 55.. But how to do it for 12 and at the end, how to form it as a double?

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You shouldn't use double for money values, bad idea. –  Petr Abdulin Oct 13 '11 at 8:05
    
I'm learning (school) and its a part of the exercise –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:07
    
@PetrAbdulin out of curiosity, what should one use then? –  Kshitij Mehta Oct 13 '11 at 8:07
    
@Kshitij: BigDecimal or String. The main point is that double simply does not have decimal places, because it's not a decimal format. –  Michael Borgwardt Oct 13 '11 at 8:10
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I'm understanding your question correctly, you're probably trying to just do this:

return (double)number / 100.;

Though a word of warning: You shouldn't be using floating-point for money due to round-off issues.

If you just want to print the number in money format, here's a 100% safe method:

System.out.print((number / 100) + ".");
int cents = number % 100;
if (cents < 10)
    System.out.print("0");
System.out.println(cents);

This can probably be simplified a lot better... Of course you can go with BigDecimal, but IMO that's smashing an ant with a sledgehammer.

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I'm learning (school) and its a part of the exercise –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:07
    
I guess for a homework assignment, you can probably get away with it. But in general, it's best to leave it as an integer representing Cents. –  Mysticial Oct 13 '11 at 8:13
    
Yes, but I have to make a Method (printMoney) which prints the money in this format: XX.XX € or whatever.. so I need the "Transformer"^^ –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:16
    
@eMi: I just edited the answer to that into my answer. –  Mysticial Oct 13 '11 at 8:18
    
it wasnt complete, i just added the same 4 Euro.. : int euro = pGeldWertGanzzahl / 100; if (euro < 10) System.out.print("0"); System.out.print((euro) + "."); int cents = pGeldWertGanzzahl % 100; if (cents < 10) System.out.print("0"); System.out.println(cents); thanks! –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:33
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That method should not exist, because it cannot give correct results.

Because internally, double is a format (binary floating-point) that cannot accurately represent a number like 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3 at all. Read the Floating-Point Guide for more information.

If you need decimals, your output format should be BigDecimal or String.

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yes thats right.. I got numbers like 0.1, but I would like to have 00.10 .. But when I type in BigDecimal, it tells me, that the type is not recognized.. –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:13
    
@eMi BigDecimal is a class and you need to import it. –  Thomas Oct 13 '11 at 8:16
    
@eMi: leading zeroes are really are about formatting, so you have to use DecimalFormat to get a String. –  Michael Borgwardt Oct 13 '11 at 8:20
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The way printing money amounts should be done is by using NumberFormat class!
Check out this example:

NumberFormat format = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance(Locale.FRANCE);
format.setCurrency(Currency.getInstance("EUR"));
System.out.println( format.format(13234.34) );

Which print this output:

13 234,34 €

You can try different locales and currency codes. See docs: http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/text/NumberFormat.html.

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public double toMoney(int number)
{
  return number / 100.0;
}

If you're dealing with monetary amounts, do bear in mind that some loss of precision can occur when you convert the number to a double.

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public double toMoney(int number)
{
return number / 100.0
}

The trick is to use 100.0 rather than 100 to force java to use double division.

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public double toMoney(int number)
{
    return number / 100.0;
}

P.S. You shouldn't use double for money values, bad idea.

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thx that worked fine :D –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:08
    
eMi: I doubt that. –  jarnbjo Oct 13 '11 at 8:23
    
look at answer: int euro = number/ 100; if (euro < 10) System.out.print("0"); System.out.print((euro) + "."); int cents = number% 100; if (cents < 10) System.out.print("0"); System.out.println(cents); that worked –  eMi Oct 13 '11 at 8:39
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