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I have created the following extension-methods. Is this a bad design? Should I do this for ICollection instead?

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Replace<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TSource> newItems)
{
    return source.Except(newItems).Union(newItems);
}

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Replace<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TSource> newItems, IEqualityComparer<TSource> comparer)
{
    return source.Except(newItems, comparer).Union(newItems, comparer);
}

Update: I think the naming is little wrong. Want I want this function to do is Add with Overwrite. Update: Added comparer to Union.

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1  
The first one would only be useful on Types with a broken Equality definition. –  Henk Holterman Oct 13 '11 at 8:25
    
Just an observation... It's not really "replacing" is it? More "adding" or "extending"? Also, isn't the Except() superfluous? –  user159335 Oct 13 '11 at 8:40
    
True. If you are replacing something you need some oldItems to replace. It would be like source.Except(oldItems).Union(newItems) –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Oct 13 '11 at 8:43
    
May be name is incorrect. Is more like Add with Overwrite. –  Amir Rezaei Oct 13 '11 at 8:51
    
You are doing nothing if you are taking the same objects from the original sequence, then adding them back. –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Oct 13 '11 at 8:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The simplified logical operation you have is

 return newItems.Union(source);
 return newItems.Union(source, comparer);

When you take source.Except(newItems).Union(newItems), you take all the distinct items in source, except any item in newItems, and then add in all the distinct items in newItems. That's what Union does! Take all the distinct items of newItems and add to it the distinct items from source that do not already exist.

You can call it by a different name AddWithOverwrite, AddWithReplace, etc., and those names would be wrong (nothing is being added to anything, neither the source nor newItems are modified in any way), but the operation itself needn't be as complicated as your code makes it.

There are tradeoffs. With the approach above, all of the newItems will come before the source. The counter is that you've already lost ordering with the replaced items.

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No.

If you look at the original extension methods in LINQ, they all use IEnumerable<T> interface. If you are using generic collections, it should be enough. However your Replace method misses a parameter for members to be replaced. You should do something like this:

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Replace<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TSource> oldItems, IEnumerable<TSource> newItems)
{
    return source.Except(oldItems).Union(newItems);
}


public static IEnumerable<TSource> Replace<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TSource> oldItems, IEnumerable<TSource> newItems, IEqualityComparer<TSource> comparer)
{
    return source.Except(oldItems, comparer).Union(newItems);
}

Update

Here's the OverWrite method I could come up with:

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> OverWrite<TSource, TSelectItem>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TSource> newItems, Func<TSource, TSelectItem> selectProperty) where TSource : class
    {
        IEnumerable<TSource> result = source;

        if (newItems != null)
        {
            result = source.Select(s => newItems.FirstOrDefault(n => EqualityComparer<TSelectItem>.Default.Equals(selectProperty(s), selectProperty(n))) ?? s);
        }

        return result;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TSource> OverWrite<TSource, TSelectItem>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TSource> newItems, Func<TSource, TSelectItem> selectProperty,IEqualityComparer<TSelectItem> propertyComparer) where TSource : class
    {
        IEnumerable<TSource> result = source;

        if (newItems != null)
        {
            result = source.Select(s => newItems.FirstOrDefault(n => propertyComparer.Equals(selectProperty(s), selectProperty(n))) ?? s);
        }

        return result;
    }

You can use it like this:

someObjects.OverWrite(newObjects, item => item.ID);
someObjects.OverWrite(newObjects, item => item.ID, new PropertyComparer());
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Yes this is more like it for Replace. However I think the naming for my method was wrong. I want to add with overwrite. –  Amir Rezaei Oct 13 '11 at 8:54
    
It won't help much if you are gonna overwrite with the same objects... What do you want to overwrite exactly? –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Oct 13 '11 at 8:55
    
you are right. But we have broken equality definition in ower objects. –  Amir Rezaei Oct 13 '11 at 9:01
    
I want to remove and add the new object. –  Amir Rezaei Oct 13 '11 at 9:02
    
I can't understand. Can you specify what objects you wanna remove? –  Ufuk Hacıoğulları Oct 13 '11 at 9:45

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