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So I decided back when I was coding to have different tables for each type of content. Now I am stuck solving this. Basically my notification system ranks the newest content by its timestamp currently. This is inaccurate however because there is a small chance that someone would submit content at the same time as another person, and incorrect ranking would occur.

Now if I had all my content in a single table, I would simply rank it by an auto-incrementing variable. Is there a way to implement this auto-increment integer across multiple tables (e.g. When something is inserted into table1, id=0, something is inserted into table2, id=1). Or do I have to recode all my stuff into a single table.

NOTE:

The reason I have content in multiple tables is because its organized and it would reduce load stress. I don't really care about the organization anymore, because I can just access the data through a GUI I coded, I'm just wondering about the load stress.

EDIT:

I'm using PHP 5 with MySQL.

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Which database are you using? –  Alfwed Oct 13 '11 at 8:25
    
What database engine are you using? –  Rowland Shaw Oct 13 '11 at 8:25
    
Sorry, I'm using MySQL –  liamzebedee Oct 13 '11 at 8:31
    
Regardless of whether you use a datetime or an arbitrary rank, if two people submit a new item at the same time shouldn't that value be the same for both? I mean, what other behavior would you want? –  Jordan Oct 13 '11 at 8:36
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@Dems In that case the OP should just ORDER BY a second column so rows with identical ranks will always appear in the same order. –  Jordan Oct 13 '11 at 8:49
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can create a table with auto increment id just to keep track of ids. Your program would do an insert on that table, get the id, use it as necessary.

Something along the lines of:

function getNextId() {
    $res = mysql_query("INSERT INTO seq_table(id) VALUES (NULL)");
    $id = mysql_insert_id();
    if ($id % 10 == 0) {
        mysql_query("DELETE FROM seq_table");
    }
    return $id;
}

Where seq_table is a table that you've to create just to get the ids. Make it a function so it can be used whenever you need. Every 10 ids generated I delete all generated ids, anyway you don't need them there. I don't delete every time since it would slow down. If another insert happen in the meantime and I delete 11 or more records, it doesn't affect the behaviour of this procedure. It's safe for the purpose it has to reach.

Even if the table is empty new ids will just keep on growing since you've declared id as auto-increment.

UPDATE: I want to clarify why the ID generation is not wrapped in a transaction and why it shouldn't.

If you generate an auto id and you rollback the transaction, the next auto id, will be incremented anyway. Excerpt from a MySQL bug report:

[...] this is not a bug but expected behavior that happens in every RDBMS we know. Generated values are not a part of transaction and they don't care about other statements.

Getting the ID with this procedure is perfectly thread safe. Your logic after the ID is obtained should be wrapped in a transaction, especially if you deal with multiple tables.

Getting a sequence in this way isn't a new concept, for instance, the code of metabase_mysql.php which is a stable DB access library has a method called GetSequenceNextValue() which is quite similar.

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Seriously, this is great. I never knew about this mysql_insert_id() function. Makes it way easier, NO MORE RECODING NIGHTMARES! I still have to test it, but it should work. One question, using DELETE FROM seq_table, wouldn't that delete all rows? If so, would that remove the data from mysql_insert_id()? Also theres an error in your code, no ints in PHP –  liamzebedee Oct 13 '11 at 8:41
    
Note: This involves at least two trips to the SQL server. (One updates the table, and returns the id to the php script, the second uses it for your business logic.) This overhead is negligible in low volumes, but can rack up in high volume scenarios. –  MatBailie Oct 13 '11 at 8:42
    
not ACID safe, must be within transaction! –  TMS Oct 13 '11 at 8:43
    
The deletion of spent IDs from this table is not thread safe! You should never ever delete spent IDs. Just keep incrementing. Even if you end up not using an ID that you requested. –  0xCAFEBABE Oct 13 '11 at 8:44
1  
@TomasT. it has no importance at all. I just want to get an unique id and that is what i get. if then i delete 10 or 12 rows, because some rows were inserted in the background it doesn't matter. i could have put a random number to decide whether to delete or not. –  stivlo Oct 13 '11 at 8:56
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Your question, particularly the need for ID spanning over multiple tables, is clearly signalizing that your database design needs change. You should make one table for all content types (as a generalization), with autoincrementing ID. Then, for each particular content type, you can define other table (equivalent of inheritance in OOP) with extra fields, and foreign key pointing to the basic table.

In other words, you need something like inheritance in SQL.

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I will investigate into this and probably implement it. I guess a lazy coder is often a bad one. I was wondering, as this was one of the original reasons I used this db structure, is it less/more strenuous on the server accessing multiple tables, or a single table? –  liamzebedee Oct 13 '11 at 8:55
    
@LiamE-p : That totally depends on two things - Your indexes, and your queries. Queries that span multiple table can almost certainly be made to be faster. Queries that target one or other table can be simplified to look at just one table, and with an index on a content type field, you will often not notice the difference. Especially if the index being used is a clustered index (the primary key in MySQL). Separation into several tables (partitioning) is an optimisation that is used, but should generally be reserved for when it's Needed rather than as a safety net. –  MatBailie Oct 13 '11 at 9:03
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@LiamE-p, laziness is a virtue! :-) –  stivlo Oct 13 '11 at 9:04
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@LiamE-p, I don't think its more strenuous to access multiple tables. The SQL servers are pretty optimized to things like table JOINs etc. (if you have keys and indices properly defined). So don't complicate your design by trying to "save some tables". In db design it is good practice to try to achieve a clean design without looking too much at the table count. –  TMS Oct 13 '11 at 9:11
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In a single table, you could have a field for the content type and clustered index that includes the content type field. This effectively keeps all of one content type in one place on the disc, and another content type in another place, etc. (It's actually organised into pages, but this physical organisation is still true.)

Assuming that each content type has the same fields, this would likely meet your needs and behave similarly to multiple tables. In some cases you may even find that, with appropriate indexes, a single table solution can be faster, more convenient and maintainable, etc. Such as trying to create global unique identifiers across all content types.


If you're unable to merge these back into a single table, you could create a central link table...

CREATE TABLE content_link (
  id            INT IDENTITY(1,1),         -- MS SQL SERVER syntax
  content_type  INT,
  content_id    INT                        -- The id from the real table
)

As you insert into the content tables, also insert into the link table to create your globally unique id.


More simply, but even more manually, just hold a single value somewhere in the database. Whenever you need a new id, use that centrally stored value and increment it by one. Be sure to wrap the increment and collection in a single transaction to stop race conditions. (This can be done in a number of ways, depending on your flavor of SQL.)

EDIT

A couple of MySQL example lines of code from the web...

START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO foo (auto,text)
    VALUES(NULL,'text');         # generate ID by inserting NULL
INSERT INTO foo2 (id,text)
    VALUES(LAST_INSERT_ID(),'text');  # use ID in second table
COMMIT TRANSACTION;


Personally, I'd actually store the value in a variable, commit the transaction, and then continue with my business logic. This would keep the locks on the tables to a minimum.

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It wasn't when I wrote it. The OP made changes when I was half way through. –  MatBailie Oct 13 '11 at 8:52
    
@Dems I am particually interested in your end paragraph. Could you link or provide some examples of "wrap the increment and collection in a single transaction to stop race conditions." –  liamzebedee Oct 13 '11 at 9:14
    
A few lines for MySQL (gleened from google) added to the answer. –  MatBailie Oct 13 '11 at 9:24
    
However, probably you don't understand how auto increment works with MySQL. if you generate an auto id and you rollback the transaction, the next auto id, won't be the same, it will be incremented anyway. thus adding a transaction here is not useful. Excerpt from the link: "[...] this is not a bug but expected behavior that happens in every RDBMS we know. Generated values are not a part of transaction and they don't care about other statements." –  stivlo Oct 13 '11 at 9:40
    
@stivlo : My code sample doesn't include a ROLLBACK - This behaviour is not unique to MySQL. It also strengthens the suggestion to use a local variable to take the value out of the transaction, and implement the business logic After the COMMIT. (Binding the creation and gathering of the new unique id within it's own transaction prevents a race condition, where two processes write to the table, then read back from it in different orders.) As a DB Artchitect, I really do understand race conditions, transactional data processing, and how rollbacks work. –  MatBailie Oct 13 '11 at 9:53
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You could have a separate ID table, insert into that, and use the newly-inserted ID.

e.g.

CREATE TABLE ids (INT UNSIGNED AUTO INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, timeadded DATETIME);

In the script:

<?php
$r = mysql_query('INSERT INTO ids (timeadded) VALUES (NOW())');
$id = mysql_insert_id();
mysql_query("INSERT INTO someOtherTable (id, data) VALUES ('$id', '$data)");

Add error checking etc. to taste.

The MySQL manual states:

The ID that was generated is maintained in the server on a per-connection basis. This means that the value returned by the function to a given client is the first AUTO_INCREMENT value generated for most recent statement affecting an AUTO_INCREMENT column by that client. This value cannot be affected by other clients, even if they generate AUTO_INCREMENT values of their own. This behavior ensures that each client can retrieve its own ID without concern for the activity of other clients, and without the need for locks or transactions.

(Source) So I don't think concerns about ACID complians are a problem.

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1  
Note: This involves two trips to the SQL server. (One updates the table, and returns the id to the php script, the second uses it for your business logic.) This overhead is negligible in low volumes, but can rack up in high volume scenarios. –  MatBailie Oct 13 '11 at 8:42
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this is not ACID safe! You need transaction to do this. –  TMS Oct 13 '11 at 8:42
    
'The ID that was generated is maintained in the server on a per-connection basis.' - since PHP is not threaded, the same connection can only be used by one path of execution at a time, so I don't think it's a problem. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/… –  Daren Chandisingh Oct 13 '11 at 8:50
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@TomasT. again, the generation of the ids with auto increment attribute is internally a transaction in MySQL, it will never return two same ids, once every thread has a different id, the insert can proceed in parallel without problems. –  stivlo Oct 13 '11 at 8:54
    
@Daren & stivlo, Daren's code is not ACID safe, because it contains 2 queries, one based on the result of another. Anything can happen in the mean-time! E.g. the original record in ids can be deleted. –  TMS Oct 13 '11 at 8:57
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