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When we install a program (e.g. a DBMS), it can be natively run by shell commands; but for running it within PHP, Perl, Python, etc, we need appropriate API/Driver. This may slow down the process and put new limitations (e.g. CBD does not need to fit within the memory, but using it with CDB_File in Perl needs).

Question 1: Is shell the fastest and best place for running a program (regardless of our application and purpose).

It is common to execute ssh commands within PHP with exec() or shell_exec(). But this is on rare occasion.

Question 2: Is it convinient to mix php codes with shell commands on a regular basis? Creating a long shell script then running it within php by exec("./shell.sh"). Is there any security issue or problematic consideration for this class of web scripting?

Question 3: PHP (and other scripting languages) itself run a shell command to do a process (e.g. reading a file or connecting to database). Right? Thus, shell command is inevitable via php or direct command?

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2 Answers 2

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In addition to hakre's comments....

It is common to execute ssh commands within PHP with exec() or shell_exec(). But this is on rare occasion.

Leaving aside the glaring oxymoron in the 2 sentences, invoking ssh via exec/shell_exec is a very dumb idea. As a quick hack where you know that key pair authentication is in place, then it will solve the problem - but for more general application you should use proc_open in order to use proper handshaking on the relevant streams - or the ssh2 extension.

Regarding q3, no. Where PHP provides a function, almost inevitably it will be implemented as a native function call by the current process/thread (the only exception I'm aware of is the mail() command on POSIX systems). Using exec, shell_exec, passthru, popen... etc a new process must be created.

Regarding security....since a webserver (and therefore its scripts) run a single uid, there are usually additional constraints placed on access beyond those of the user's permissions and ulimit (e.g. base_opendir) - but these do not apply to seperate processes. So you cross context into a different security model when you start a new process.

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Thanks for your descriptive answer. Do you mean that when creating a file, php directly communicates with the linux kernel? –  All Oct 13 '11 at 12:28
    
Yes. Only the kernel can actually crate / read/ write files on the filesystem - and there is no additional process mediating the calls from PHP to the OS. –  symcbean Oct 14 '11 at 7:43

Question 1: Is shell the fastest and best place for running a program (regardless of our application and purpose).

That depends on whether or not the command-line-interface of that program is the fastest way to interface with that program or not, and if that CLI interface of that program is the best way to run that program. So it depends on the the program. E.g. you can execute the Firefox web-browser via the shell, however it's not the best place to use it.

Question 2: Is it convinient [sic!] to mix php codes with shell commands on a regular basis? Creating a long shell script then running it within php by exec("./shell.sh"). Is there any security issue or problematic consideration for this class of web scripting?

What's convenient or not depends on a user's perception when it comes to using shell commands on a regular basis. Naturally as everything that runs on a computer has security implications, this is true for shell scripts as well.

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1. I meant when we run firefox it will be executed via shell to the OS kerl. Thus, this is half of the way wee need to go to run firefox. 2. I meant is it OK to have lots of shell commands within php? –  All Oct 13 '11 at 8:55
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@Ali: why not? In my opinion you should always use the tool, that works best for a specific job. When it is a shell script, just use shell script -- even if it's executed through PHP. However: make sure to sanitize any (dynamic) arguments, that are passed to the shell script (using escapeshellarg for example) –  aurora Oct 13 '11 at 9:04
    
That depends. It can be ok, just take care you're clear what you do if you mix processes. Infact, it's in the history of webservers to actually execute shell scripts, that's how the CGI interface was born. You can execute shell scripts with PHP as well, just use the language as a tool. PHP often is glue, combining other components to server HTTP responses. If a program has a PHP API it's most often more flexible, but sure each abstraction / encapsulation comes with a price. Shell scripts are often more direct, but can be harder to maintain in the end. It just depends, you define the interface. –  hakre Oct 13 '11 at 9:05
    
@hakre: You gave me an invaluable hint! –  All Oct 13 '11 at 9:15
    
@harald: You quoted an important issue, as we need to consider for INSERT into SQL database –  All Oct 13 '11 at 9:17

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