Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm just coding basic "encrypt" and "decrypt" methods for AES on iPhone, using CCrypt.

I've been running a few tests and I was really struck about finding that, sometimes, if you try to decrypt an encrypted text using a key different than the one that was used to encrypt the plain text CCrypt would not return any errors.

Here is an example:

- (void) testDecryptTextWithTheWrongKey {
    NSData *encryptKey = [Base64 decodeBase64WithString:@"+LtNYThpgIlQs2CaL00R6AuG2C/i6U1Vt1+6wfFeFMk="];
    NSData *decryptKey = [Base64 decodeBase64WithString:@"yg7BvhM8npVGpAFpAESDn3IRWpe6qeQWaa1rwHiTsyU="];

    NSString *plainText = @"The text to be encrypted";
    NSData *plainTextData = [plainText dataUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];

    NSError *error = nil;
    NSData *encrypted = [LocalCrypto encryptText:plainTextData key:encryptKey error:&error];

    assertThat(error, nilValue());
    assertThat(encrypted, notNilValue());

    error = nil;
    NSData *decrypted = [LocalCrypto decryptText:encrypted key:decryptKey error:&error];

    assertThat(error, notNilValue());
    assertThat(decrypted, nilValue());
}

My encrypt and decrypt methods defined in LocalCrypto simply call an internal "executeCryptoOperation" method indicating that they want to encrypt or decrypt:

+ (NSData *) executeCryptoOperation:(CCOperation)op key:(NSData *) key input:(NSData *) input error:(NSError **)error {
    size_t outLength;
    NSMutableData *output = [NSMutableData dataWithLength:input.length + kCCBlockSizeAES128];

    CCCryptorStatus result = CCCrypt(op,                    // operation
                                     kCCAlgorithmAES128,    // Algorithm
                                     kCCOptionPKCS7Padding | kCCOptionECBMode, // options
                                     key.bytes,             // key
                                     key.length,            // keylength
                                     nil,                   // iv
                                     input.bytes,           // dataIn
                                     input.length,          // dataInLength,
                                     output.mutableBytes,   // dataOut
                                     output.length,         // dataOutAvailable
                                     &outLength);           // dataOutMoved

    if (result == kCCSuccess) {
        output.length = outLength;
    } else {
        *error = [NSError errorWithDomain:kCryptoErrorDomain code:result userInfo:nil];
        return nil;
    }

    return output;
}

Well, my question is: is it normal that CCrypt returns kCCSuccess when we try to decrypt the encrypted text with a different key than the one used during the encrpytion? Am I missing something or doing something wrong?

It is true that even when CCrypt returns success for the decryption, I can't get a proper NSString out of the resulting data but I would certainly expect CCrypt to return some sort of error in this situation (as Java would probably do).

If this is the normal behavior, how am I supposed to know if the decrypt operation returned the real plain text or just a bunch of bytes that don't make any sense?

There is a similar question here, but the answer doesn't really convince me: Returning wrong decryption text when using invalid key

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
The answer in the linked question makes perfect sense. As long as your key meets the requirements, it is used to decrypt the encrypted string, and no error has occurred. How and why should it know what the decrypted text is supposed to look like? –  jrturton Oct 13 '11 at 8:56
    
I see your point and it does make sense. The thing that is getting me all confused is that if I run the same test in Java (encrypting with a key and decrypting with another) I get an exception during the decryption (a BadPaddingException to be more specific)...any ideas on why Java "detects" that something wrong is going on and iOS doesn't? –  jsanchez Oct 13 '11 at 9:16
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are cipher algorithms which include padding (like the PKCS#5 padding in your Java implementation), and there are ones which don't.

If your encryption algorithm used padding, the corresponding decryption algorithm expects that there will be well-formed padding in the decrypted plaintext, too. This serves as a cheap partial integrity check, since with a wrong key the output likely will not have a right padding. (The chance that a random n-byte block (n=16 for AES) has a valid PKCS#5 padding is 1/256 + 1/(256^2) + ... + 1/(256^n), which is only slightly more than 1/256.)

It might be that your objective-C CCCrypt function does not check that the padding is valid, only its last byte (or even only some bits of this last byte), to see how many bytes were padded (and are now to be cut off).

If you want to make sure that the key is right, encrypt some known part of the plaintext, and error out if it is not in the decrypted part. (But don't do this with ECB mode, see below.)

If you also want to make sure that the data was not modified, also use a MAC, or use a combined authenticated encryption mode of operation for your block cipher.

Another note: You should not use ECB mode, but instead a secure mode of operation (about any other mode indicated in this article and supported by your implementation will do - standard nowadays is CBC or CTR mode). Some modes (like CFB, OFB and CTR) don't need padding at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Paulo. That makes things clearer for me :) –  jsanchez Oct 14 '11 at 9:25
add comment

You're missing the fact that the decryption function has no idea whatsoever what the plaintext (decrypted data) is supposed to look like.

As far as the decryption function is concerned, it got a key and a ciphertext from you, applied the decryption routine to the ciphertext using the key you provided, and no errors arose. Hence, success.

It's your job to verify that the plaintext you got was actually correct/on the format you expected it to be.

share|improve this answer
    
I see your point and it does make sense. The thing that is getting me all confused is that if I run the same test in Java (encrypting with a key and decrypting with another) I get an exception during the decryption (a BadPaddingException to be more specific)...any ideas on why Java "detects" that something wrong is going on and iOS doesn't? –  jsanchez Oct 13 '11 at 9:16
    
Padding has very few allowed formats. An incorrect key is very unlikely to result in correct padding at the end of the last block. What padding is your decrypt method expecting? –  rossum Oct 13 '11 at 9:28
    
In Java, the padding scheme that I'm using is PKCS#5 –  jsanchez Oct 13 '11 at 9:39
    
I'd guess that it has something to do with the specific implementation in Java. You could update your question with the exact java method you're using, preferably with a link to the documentation. –  uvesten Oct 13 '11 at 10:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.